Italian master of the 17th century; THE ROYAL OF THE SABINERS 01 Painting, Olympian deities, by the Old Masters, with footnotes #36

Italian master of the 17th century
Italian master of the 17th century
THE ROYAL OF THE SABINERS
Oil on canvas. Relined.
117 x 187 cm.
Private collection

In the center of the large-format picture, in the open air, two Romans in armor with spring-loaded helmet, holding in their hands a young woman who defends herself with arms raised against their abduction. On the left side of the picture the wide sea with a big sailboat. A young man with a helmet and a paddle in his hands seems to be waiting for the abductee to take her away with his boat. On the right side underneath a round temple eager battles fight, in which also a horse is to be seen. More on this painting


The Sabines were an Italic people that lived in the central Apennine Mountains of ancient Italy, also inhabiting Latium north of the Anio before the founding of Rome.
The Sabines divided into two populations just after the founding of Rome, which is described by Roman legend. The division, however it came about, is not legendary. The population closer to Rome transplanted itself to the new city and united with the preexisting citizenry, beginning a new heritage that descended from the Sabines but was also Latinized. The second population remained a mountain tribal state, coming finally to war against Rome for its independence along with all the other Italic tribes. After losing, it became assimilated into the Roman Republic. More on The Sabines
In art history, “Old Master” refers to any painter of skill who worked in Europe before about 1800, or a painting by such an artist. The term “old master drawing” is used in the same way.
In theory, “Old Master” applies only to artists who were fully trained, were Masters of their local artists’ guild, and worked independently, but in practice, paintings produced by pupils or workshops are often included in the scope of the term. Therefore, beyond a certain level of competence, date rather than quality is the criterion for using the term. More on the Old Master

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ITALIAN SCHOOL; THE THREE GRACES 01 Paintings, Olympian deities, by the Old Masters, with footnotes #37

ITALIAN SCHOOL, (17th century)
THE THREE GRACES

Oil on canvas
59 1/2 x 44 in. (151.1 x 111.8cm)
Private collection

In Greek mythology, a Charis or Grace is one of three or more minor goddesses of charm, beauty, nature, human creativity, and fertility, together known as the Charites or Graces. The usual list, from youngest to oldest is Aglaea (“Splendor”), Euphrosyne (“Mirth”), and Thalia (“Good Cheer”). In Roman mythology they were known as the Gratiae, the “Graces”. In some variants, Charis was one of the Graces and was not the singular form of their name.

The Charites were usually considered the daughters of Zeus and Eurynome, though they were also said to be daughters of Dionysus and Aphrodite or of Helios and the naiad Aegle. Other possible names of their mother by Zeus are Eurydome, Eurymedousa, and Euanthe. Homer wrote that they were part of the retinue of Aphrodite. The Charites were also associated with the Greek underworld and the Eleusinian Mysteries.

The river Cephissus near Delphi was sacred to them. More Three Graces (aka the Charities)

Painting in 17th-century Italy was an international endeavor. Large numbers of artists traveled to Rome, especially, to work and study. They sought not only the many commissions being extended by the Church but also the chance to learn from past masters. Most of the century was dominated by the baroque style, whose expressive power was well suited to the needs of the Counter-Reformation Church for affecting images.


The drama and movement that characterized the baroque—in sculpture and architecture as well as painting—can be first seen, perhaps, in the work of Caravaggio, who died in 1610. His strong contrasts of light and dark and unblinking realism were taken up by many artists, including the Italian Orazio Gentileschi, the Spaniard Jusepe de Ribera, and the Frenchmen Valentin de Boulogne and Simon Vouet, all of whom worked in Italy. Other artists carried Caravaggio’s so-called tenebrist style to northern Europe.


The more classical approach of the Carracci and their students Guercino and Domenichino was also an important force in 17th-century painting. It provided a foundation for the rational clarity that structured the work of French artists Nicolas Poussin and Claude Lorrain, both of whom worked in Rome for most of their lives. More on the ITALIAN SCHOOL, (17th century)

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Gabrielle Bakker, Leda 01 Contemporary Interpretations of Olympian deities, with footnotes #15

Gabrielle Bakker
Leda, 2011

Oil Linen on Panel
50″ x 42″
Private collection

Leda, in Greek legend, usually believed to be the daughter of Thestius, king of Aetolia, and wife of Tyndareus, king of Lacedaemon. She was also believed to have been the mother (by Zeus, who had approached and seduced her in the form of a swan) of the other twin, Pollux, and of Helen, both of whom hatched from eggs. Variant legends gave divine parentage to both the twins and possibly also to Clytemnestra, with all three of them having hatched from the eggs of Leda, while yet other legends say that Leda bore the twins to her mortal husband, Tyndareus. Still other variants say that Leda may have hatched out Helen from an egg laid by the goddess Nemesis, who was similarly approached by Zeus in the form of a swan.The divine swan’s encounter with Leda was a subject depicted by both ancient Greek and Italian Renaissance artists; Leonardo da Vinci undertook a painting (now lost) of the theme, and Correggio’s Leda (c. 1530s) is a well-known treatment of the subject. More Leda and The Swan

Born in Ann Arbor, MI, in 1958, Gabrielle Bakker attended the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, graduating with a BFA in 1982. She continued her study at Yale University, where she studied under William Bailey and received her MFA in 1984. Since then she has been awarded the Pollack-Krasner Foundation Grant and the Academy Award in Painting from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. She has exhibited at the Laguna Museum, CA; Frye Art Museum, Seattle; Earl McGarth Gallery, NYC; Mincher/Wilcox Gallery, San Francisco; and the Dart Gallery in Chicago. Bakker’s work is in the public collections of the HBO Coporation, Chicago, the Santa Baraba University Museum, the San Jose Art Museum, and the Art Institue of Chiacgo. She currently lives and works in Seattle. More on Gabrielle Bakker

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Adolf Frey-Moock, MAIDEN WITH PAN 01 Painting, Olympian deities, with footnotes #38

Adolf Frey-Moock, (German 1882-1954)
MAIDEN WITH PAN

Oil on board
23 9/16 x 19 11/16 in. (60 x 50cm)
Private collection

In ancient Greek religion and mythology, Pan is the god of the wild, shepherds and flocks, nature of mountain wilds, rustic music and impromptus, and companion of the nymphs. He has the hindquarters, legs, and horns of a goat, in the same manner as a faun or satyr. With his homeland in rustic Arcadia, he is also recognized as the god of fields, groves, wooded glens and often affiliated with sex; because of this, Pan is connected to fertility and the season of spring. The ancient Greeks also considered Pan to be the god of theatrical criticism. The word panic ultimately derives from the god’s name.

In Roman religion and myth, Pan’s counterpart was Faunus, a nature god who was the father of Bona Dea, sometimes identified as Fauna; he was also closely associated with Sylvanus, due to their similar relationships with woodlands. In the 18th and 19th centuries, Pan became a significant figure in the Romantic movement of western Europe and also in the 20th-century Neopagan movement. More on Pan

Adolf Frey-Moock, (German 1882-1954) was a Swiss painter who also worked in Munich .


Adolf Frey-Moock came from a farmer family. After the apprenticeship of ecclesiastical fresco painting he studied since October 30, 1904 at the Academy of Fine Arts in Munich with Karl Raupp and Wilhelm von Diez and 1909 assistant to Franz von Stuck in his studio.


In Frey-Moock’s works influence of Franz von Stuck and Arnold Böcklin is noticeable. He showed his pictures in the exhibitions of the Munich Artists’ Association The Independents . In the 1930s Frey-Moock lived in Nördlingen , then in Munich, and finally returned to Switzerland. More on Adolf Frey-Moock

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William-Adolphe Bouguereau, Nymphs and Satyr 01 Painting, Olympian deities, with footnotes #39

William-Adolphe Bouguereau, (1825–1905)
Nymphs and Satyr, c. (1873)

Oil on canvas
Dimensions
Sterling & Francine Clark Art Institute, United States

According to the Clark Institute, in the painting “a group of nymphs have been surprised, while bathing in a secluded pond, by a lascivious satyr. Some of the nymphs have retreated into the shadows on the right; others, braver than their friends, are trying to dampen the satyr’s ardor by pulling him into the cold water — one of the satyr’s hooves is already wet and he clearly wants to go no further. Bouguereau’s working methods were traditional; he made a number of sketches and drawings of carefully posed human figures in complicated interconnected poses, linking them together in this wonderfully rhythmical composition.” More on this painting

William-Adolphe Bouguereau (30 November 1825 – 19 August 1905) was a French academic painter. In his realistic genre paintings he used mythological themes, making modern interpretations of classical subjects, with an emphasis on the female human body. During his life he enjoyed significant popularity in France and the United States, was given numerous official honors, and received top prices for his work. As the quintessential salon painter of his generation, he was reviled by the Impressionist avant-garde. By the early twentieth century, Bouguereau and his art fell out of favor with the public, due in part to changing tastes. In the 1980s, a revival of interest in figure painting led to a rediscovery of Bouguereau and his work. Throughout the course of his life, Bouguereau executed 822 known finished paintings, although the whereabouts of many are still unknown. More on William-Adolphe Bouguereau

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Narcisse Virgile Diaz de la Peña, Departure of Diana to the hunt 01 Painting, Olympian deities, by the Old Masters, with footnotes #39

Narcisse Virgile Diaz de la Peña (French, 1808-1876)
Départ de Diane pour la chasse/ Departure of Diana to the hunt

Oil on canvas
21 3/4 x 13 1/2in (55.3 x 34.4cm)
Private collection

In Roman mythology, Diana was the goddess of the hunt, the moon and nature being associated with wild animals and woodland, and having the power to talk to and control animals. She was eventually equated with the Greek goddess Artemis, though she had an independent origin in Italy. Diana was worshipped in ancient Roman religion and is revered in Roman Neopaganism and Stregheria. Diana was known to be the virgin goddess of childbirth and women. She was one of the three maiden goddesses — along with Minerva and Vesta — who swore never to marry. More on Diane

Narcisse-Virgile Diaz de la Peña, (born 1808, Bordeaux, France—died November 18, 1876, Menton), French painter and lithographer of the group of landscape painters known as the Barbizon school who is distinguished for his numerous Romantic depictions of the forest of Fontainebleau and his landscape fantasies with mythological figures.


At 15 Diaz began working as a ceramic painter for the Sèvres porcelain factory. He studied for a time with the academic painter Alexandre Cabanel. Strongly influenced by Delacroix and the Romantics and attracted by medieval and Middle Eastern art, he often in his early career painted exotic subjects.


About 1840 Diaz began to paint landscapes in the forest of Fontainebleau near the village of Barbizon. These landscapes, which dominated his work for the rest of his career, characteristically have a pervasive sense of the shadowy seclusion of the forest—e.g., Forest Scene (1867). Dense, vividly coloured foliage is broken by spots of light or patches of sky shining through the branches. During the last 15 years of his life Diaz seldom exhibited publicly. He was helpful and sympathetic to the Impressionists, especially Renoir, whom he met in 1861 painting at Barbizon. More on Narcisse-Virgile Diaz de la Peña

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Josh Keyes; Siren 01 Contemporary Interpretations of Olympian deities, with footnotes #17

Josh Keyes
Siren, c. 2018

Acrylic on wood panel
30″ × 24″
Private collection

Portland-based artist Josh Keyes (previously) paints hyperrealistic depictions of what he perceives the world might look like after the fall of humans. Animals such as sharks, tigers, and bulls remain as the final witnesses to the aftermath of human destruction—observing blazing fires, investigating displaced commercial objects, and swimming amongst melted ice caps. More on this painting

According to Greek myths, sirens were powerful and erotic creatures, and many unsuspecting sailors would fall prey to their seductive beauty. The common belief was that they would devour sailors after their ships would crash into the rocks, as most men couldn’t resist the temptation of their sweet melodies and angelic faces. More on The Fisherman and The Siren

Josh Keyes, born in 1969 in Tacoma Washington.  Josh Keyes received his BFA in 1992 from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and an MFA in 1998 from Yale University School of Art.  He has exhibited his work nationally and internationally and has work in private and public collections. Keyes currently lives and works in Portland Oregon. More on Josh Keyes

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