15 Classic Works of Art, Marine Paintings – With Footnotes, #35

Leslie Arthur Wilcox, British, 1904-1982 

The USS ‘United States’ Engaging the HMS ‘Macedonian’ , c. 1977

Oil on canvas 

24 x 36 inches

Private collection

The battle between these two frigates was fought near Madeira on October 25, 1812, the ‘United States’ being commanded by Steven Decater. After a long, bloody battle, the ‘United States’ captured the ‘Macedonian’ and escorted her to Newport, the first British warship ever brought into an American harbor. The British frigate was later recommissoned by the US Navy as the USS ‘Macedonian’ and remained in service until 1836. More on this painting

Leslie Arthur Wilcox, RI, RSMA (13 March 1904 – 11 January 1982) was an eminent British artist known mainly as a marine artist working in oils. He was also a watercolourist, illustrator, poster artist, marine model-maker and author. He was for some years Honorary Secretary of the Royal Society of Marine Artists and a member of the Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours. His works are in many collections around the world, including the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, and the Royal Collection. He wrote and illustrated two books on maritime history: Mr Pepys’ Navy (1966 G. Bell & Sons Ltd., London) and Anson’s Voyage (1969 G. Bell & Sons, Ltd., London). More on Leslie Arthur Wilcox

Montague Dawson RMSA, FRSA (1890–1973) 

The Torrens in California Waters

oil on canvas

28 × 42 in

Private collection

Torrens (1875 – 1910) was a clipper ship designed to carry passengers and cargo between London and Port Adelaide, South Australia. She was the fastest ship to sail on that route

It is likely that the vessel was named in honour of Colonel Robert Torrens, a principal exponent of the economic benefits of nineteenth-century colonial trade. 

The Torrens was aimed at the upper end of the market – accommodation was first and second class passengers only. Apart from the crew, she carried “a surgeon, a stewardess and a good cow”

She lost her foremast and main topmast in 1891, and while being refitting in Pernambuco a fire broke out on board. On the evening of 11 January 1899 she struck an iceberg some 40 km south west of the Crozet Islands and limped into Adelaide dismasted, with her bow stoved in. In 1906 the Torrens was sold for £1,500 (she cost £27,257 to build) to an Italian shipping line, but after running her ashore, she was sent to the shipbreakers. They were however so taken by her aesthetic appearance that they refused to break her up, and repaired her instead. But it was not long before she again ran aground. She was finally broken up at Genoa in 1910. More on the Torrens 

Montague Dawson RMSA, FRSA (1890–1973) was a British painter who was renowned as a maritime artist. His most famous paintings depict sailing ships, usually clippers or warships of the 18th and 19th centuries. Montague was the son of a keen yachtsman and the grandson of the marine painter Henry Dawson (18111878), born in Chiswick, London. Much of his childhood was spent on Southampton Water where he was able to indulge his interest in the study of ships. For a brief period around 1910 Dawson worked for a commercial art studio in Bedford Row, London, but with the outbreak of the First World War he joined the Royal Navy. Whilst serving with the Navy in Falmouth he met Charles Napier Hemy (18411917), who considerably influenced his work. In 1924 Dawson was the official artist for an Expedition to the South Seas by the steam yacht St.George. During the expedition he provided illustrated reports to the Graphic magazine.

After the War, Dawson established himself as a professional marine artist, concentrating on historical subjects and portraits of deep-water sailing ships. During the Second World War, he was employed as a war artist. Dawson exhibited regularly at the Royal Society of Marine Artists, of which he became a member, from 1946 to 1964, and occasionally at the Royal Academy between 1917 and 1936. By the 1930s he was considered one of the greatest living marine artists, whose patrons included two American Presidents, Dwight D Eisenhower and Lyndon B Johnson, as well as the British Royal Family. Also in the 1930s, he moved to Milford-Upon-Sea in Hampshire, living there for many years. Dawson is noted for the strict accuracy in the nautical detail of his paintings which often sell for six figures.

The work of Montague Dawson is represented in the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich and the Royal Naval Museum, Portsmouth. More on Montague Dawson

 

James E. Buttersworth, 1817 to 1894.

The Clipper Ship “Flying Cloud” off the Needles, Isle of Wight, 1859-1860.

Oil on canvas

The Needles is a row of three distinctive stacks of chalk that rise about 30m out of the sea off the western extremity of the Isle of Wight, United Kingdom, close to Alum Bay, and part of Totland, the westernmost Civil Parish of the Isle of Wight. The Needles Lighthouse stands at the outer, western end of the formation. Built in 1859, it has been automated since 1994.

The formation takes its name from a fourth needle-shaped pillar called Lot’s Wife, that collapsed in a storm in 1764. The remaining rocks are not at all needle-like, but the name has stuck. More on The Needles

 

The Flying Cloud of 1851 was the most famous of the extreme clippers built by Donald McKay in East Boston, Massachusetts. The Flying Cloud was purchased at launching by Grinnell, Minturn & Co., of New York, for $90,000, which represented a huge profit for Train & Co. Within six weeks she sailed from New York and made San Francisco ’round Cape Horn in 89 days, 21 hours under the command of Captain Josiah Perkins Creesy. In the early days of the California Gold Rush, it took more than 200 days for a ship to travel from New York to San Francisco.. On the 31st of July, during the trip, she made 374 miles in 24 hours. In 1853 she beat her own record by 13 hours, a world beating record that stood for 136 years, until 1989 when the breakthrough-designed sailboat Thursday’s Child completed the passage in 80 days, 20 hours.

James Edward Buttersworth (British/American, 1817-1894)

The American clipper ship Flying Cloud, c. 1854

Oil on canvas

20 x 30 in

Private collection

The American clipper ship Flying Cloud, Scudding in a Gale of Wind off Cape Horn

on her record-breaking voyage to San Francisco around Cape Horn in 89 days, April 20th 1854.

Apparently, Flying Cloud and her record breaking passage between New York and San Francisco was one of James E. Buttersworth’s favorite clipper ship subjects. In addition to this one, and the one sold at these sale rooms last year [Bonhams, Important Maritime Paintings & Decorative Arts, January 2013, Sale 20482, Lot 113] (below), the one listed in the Grassby book, Ship, Sea & Sky, and another one listed in the Schaefer (further down) book makes four paintings, all the same size and period, circa 1854. More on this painting

Cape Horn, named after the city of Hoorn in the Netherlands, is the southernmost headland of the Tierra del Fuego archipelago of southern Chile, and is located on the small Hornos Island. Although not the most southerly point of South America, Cape Horn marks the northern boundary of the Drake Passage and marks where the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans meet.

For decades, Cape Horn was a major milestone on the clipper route, by which sailing ships carried trade around the world. The waters around Cape Horn are particularly hazardous, owing to strong winds, large waves, strong currents and icebergs; these dangers have made it notorious as a sailors’ graveyard.

The need for ships to round Cape Horn was greatly reduced by the opening of the Panama Canal in 1914. More on Cape Horn

James Edward Buttersworth (British/American, 1817-1894)

The clippership Flying Cloud coming out of a hurricane, circa 1855

Oil on canvas

20 x 30 in. (50.8 x 76.2 cm.)

Private collection

The Flying Cloud’s achievement was remarkable under any terms. But, was all the more unusual because her navigator was a woman, Eleanor Creesy. She was one of the first navigators to exploit the insights of Matthew Fontaine Maury, most notably the course recommended in his Sailing Directions. With her husband, ship captain Josiah Perkins Creesy More on Flying Cloud

James Edward Buttersworth (British/American, 1817-1894)

The Clipper “Flying Cloud” off Cape Horn, circa 1855

Oil on board 

Height: 50.8 cm (20 in.), Width: 76.2 cm (30 in.) 

Private collection

Cape Horn, see above

James E. Buttersworth, 1817 to 1894, see below

Raymond A. Massey 

Flying Cloud Entering Hong Kong 1851

Print, Edition: 250

26 1/2″ x 21″

Private collection

Victoria Harbour is a natural landform harbour situated between Hong Kong Island and Kowloon in Hong Kong. The harbour’s deep, sheltered waters and strategic location on the South China Sea were instrumental in Hong Kong’s establishment as a British colony and its subsequent development as a trading centre. More on Victoria Harbour

Born in Newscastle-on-Tyne, England, Raymond A. Massey is a self-taught artist who came to the United States when he was 10 and made his home in Buffalo, New York since the age of 14. A member of the Nautical Research Guild, he was elected an artist member of the American Society of Marine Artists, which was established in 1978 to encourage the preservation and appreciation of maritime history through art. 

Massey’s works have appeared in numerous art shows and galleries from coast-to-coast in the United Stares, and Canada. 

He is also published a number of books, and once wrote about historic Buffalo for the Buffalo Courier Express and illustrated historic Buffalo features in that newspaper. More on Raymond A. Massey 

 

Johan-Barthold Jongkind, 1819-1891. Paris.

Dutch landscape with a caulking barge, c. 1857.

Louvre

Johan Barthold Jongkind (3 June 1819 – 9 February 1891) was a Dutch painter and printmaker. He painted marine landscapes in a free manner and is regarded as a forerunner of Impressionism. Jongkind was born in the Netherlands. Trained at the art academy in The Hague, in 1846 he moved to Montparnasse in Paris, France where he studied under Eugène Isabey and François-Édouard Picot. Two years later, the Paris Salon accepted his work for its exhibition, and he received acclaim from critic Charles Baudelaire and later on from Émile Zola. He was to experience little success, however, and he suffered bouts of depression complicated by alcoholism.

Jongkind returned to live in Rotterdam in 1855, and remained there until 1860. Back in Paris, in 1861 he rented a studio on the rue de Chevreuse in Montparnasse where some of his paintings began to show glimpses of the Impressionist style to come. In 1862 he met in Normandy, in the famous ferme Saint-Siméon in Honfleur, with some of his artist friends, such as Alfred Sisley, Eugène Boudin, and the young Claude Monet, to all of whom Jongkind served as a mentor. Monet later referred to him as “…a quiet man with such a talent that is beyond words” and credited the “definitive education” of his own eye to Jongkind. In 1863 Jongkind exhibited at the first Salon des Refusés. He was invited to participate in the first exhibition of the Impressionist group in 1874, but he declined. He died in 1891 in Saint-Égrève. More

 

Thomas Buttersworth, Jr. (1807-1842), British

Yachting off Torquay

Oil on canvas

12 x 16 in

Private collection

Torquay  is a seaside town in Devon, England, part of the unitary authority area of Torbay. The town’s economy was initially based upon fishing and agriculture, but in the early 19th century it began to develop into a fashionable seaside resort, initially frequented by members of the Royal Navy during the Napoleonic Wars while the Royal Navy anchored in the bay. Later, as the town’s fame spread, it was popular with Victorian society. Renowned for its healthful climate, the town earned the nickname the English Riviera.

The writer Agatha Christie was born in the town and lived there during her early years and there is an “Agatha Christie Mile”, a tour with plaques dedicated to her life and work. More on Torquay

Thomas Buttersworth, Jr. (1807-1842), was named after his father, the well known marine painter Thomas Buttersworth Senior (1766-1841), who was to have a considerable influence on his son’s painting career.

There exist few details about Thomas Junior’s private life. What is known is that in the late 1830’s he was living with his wife Gertude in Lambeth, and in early 1838 his daughter, also Gertrude, was born.

The family had moved to Greenwich by 1841, and this is where their son, also named Thomas, was born in March of that year. Thomas Buttersworth Junior died in Greenwich on November 25, 1842 at the very early age of thirty five. More on Thomas Buttersworth, Jr. 

 

C. HJALMAR (CAPPY) AMUNDSEN (American, Long Island, 1911-2010)

Dock scene

Oil on canvas

20”h, 26”w

Private collection

 

J.J. Enwright (pseudonym for Hjalmar “Cappy” Amundsen) was born Caspar Hjalmar Emerson III in  New York City in 1911, and in 1946 legally changed his name to Hjalmar Amundsen in honor of his great-uncle, explorer Roald Amundsen, who located the magnetic center of the South Pole the year his great-nephew was born. 

He was in his early twenties when he first began painting.  Amundsen loved the sea, and had a lifelong interest in sailing and fishing.  While growing up, Hjalmar and his father would drive to the East End of Long Island, and he’d go out in a fishing boat.  Later he bought a small boat and went out sailing and fishing as often as he could.  

As an adult, the young artist moved back to New York and spent time painting in and around Gloucester and Provincetown, Massachusetts.  In his early career, he is believed to have created up to 275 paintings a year over a period of six years under the name of Enwright, and it is now believed that J.J. Enwright and Hjalmar Amundsen is one and the same artist. 

In 1946 he moved to Sag Harbor, Long Island, New York. He opened a studio and lived in the same building, becoming a well-liked figure in the community.  He painted waterfront images, sailing ships, fishing boats, and the New England coastline. 

Cappy lived a bohemian lifestyle, making a living with his painting, but by the 1980s  times had become tough, and it was through the initiative of friends and the community that his house was restored.  He died in Brookhaven Memorial Hospital on January 18, 2001. More on  “Cappy” Amundsen

19th Century British school

Upper reaches of the River Thames, c. 1913

Oil on canvas

14ins x 18ins

Private collection


19th Century British school – Oil painting – Upper reaches of the River Thames with a lighter to foreground and barges and masted vessels.


The River Thames is a river that flows through southern England, most notably through London. At 215 miles (346 km), it is the longest river entirely in England and the second longest in the United Kingdom. The lower reaches of the river are called the Tideway, derived from its long tidal reach up to Teddington Lock. It rises at Thames Head in Gloucestershire, and flows into the North Sea via the Thames Estuary. The Thames drains the whole of Greater London. More on The River Thames 


English school, dominant school of painting in England throughout the second half of the 18th century and the first half of the 19th. Its establishment marked the rise of a national tradition that began with the emergence of native artists whose works were no longer provincial but rivaled continental art in quality and ended by exercising considerable influence on the course of European painting. More on English school

TOMMASO DE SIMONE (Italian, c.1805-1888)

American ship in harbor, c. 1875

For ”Lewis L. Squire”, 

Gouache

18-1/2”h, 26-1/4”w. (Fine Art)

Private collection

Tomaso De Simone (c.1805-1888) was a Neapolitan port painter; and is considered to be one of the most important ship portraitists who practiced in the Italian seaport cities. The father of noted sea painter Antonio de Simone, Tomaso specialized in oils, the majority depicting warships and merchant vessels.

The architectural properties of Tomaso de Simone’s paintings are exceptional. His hull shapes have fullness and flexibility, his rigging shows a wealth of detail. His portrait of the American continental navy frigate constellation was proven so accurate that it was used as a guide for restoration of the ship, still afloat today in Baltimore. 

Although not as prolific as his son, the works of Tomaso de Simone are arguably more important. In recent years, their value has increased dramatically as they become more rare and sought after by important museums and private collectors world wide. More on Tomaso De Simone

Louis Papaluca (Italian, 1890-1934)

M.Y. Happy Days, N.Y.Y.C. In Memory of First Voyage 1928

Watercolor

16ins x 27.5ins

Private collection

“M.Y. Happy Days, N.Y.Y.C. In Memory of First Voyage 1928″” – is a study of The New York Yacht Clubs steam yacht Happy Days in the Bay of Naples with Vesuvius to background.

Louis Papaluca (Italian, 1890-1934)

Beryl R.Y.S.

Gouache

23 x 15 in.

Private collection

CHARLES ROSNER (American, Long Island, 1894-1975)

Clipper Ship Golden Eagle

Oil on canvas

24”h, 30”w.

Private collection

The U.S. Golden Eagle was an extreme clipper, built at Medford, Massachusetts, and launched on November 9, 1852. She weighed 1121 tons, had a length of 192 feet, a beam of 36 feet, a 22-foot depth of hold, a gilded eagle on the wing figurehead. 

She made a total of eight voyages from the East Coast around the Horn to San Francisco, the first out of Boston, the others out of New York. On the homeward leg of the last of these voyages, she sailed from San Francisco for Howland`s Island, where she loaded a cargo of guano, and from which she sailed about November 20, 1862, bound for Cork, for orders. On February 21, 1863 she was attacked and burned by the Confederate commerce raider CSS Alabama. Her owners, E. M. Robinson, of New Bedford, and John A. McGaw, of New York, claimed, and were allowed, insurance in the amount of $56,000 for the vessel, $30,000 for freight, and $27,522 for cargo. More on the Golden Eagle

Charles Rosner (German-American, 1894-1975) developed a fascination for sailing vessels while a child on holiday in various German seaports. He also served aboard them, accumulating five Cape Horn passages during his ocean career. After WW I he emigrated to Canada and thence to America, where his affinity for the sea propelled him into a commitment as a full-time marine painter of historic sailing vessels and other sea-faring subjects. More on Charles Rosner

Joaquin Sorolla (Soroia), 1863 – 1923

Walking along the seashore, c. 1911

Oil on Canvas

Joaquin Sorolei House Museum, Madrid

In the painting Sorolla depicted his wife Clotilde and eldest daughter Maria. “Walking along the seashore”. Soria worked on the canvas in Valencia in 1909. He has just returned to Spain from America, where his personal exhibitions in New York, Buffalo and Boston were held with great success and where he created about 20 portraits, Including the then US President Taft . 

The women are graceful, dressed in elegant white dresses and fashionable shoes. The images are completed by beige hats, decorated with flowers, and a white umbrella, which is held by the older woman (Clotilde). More on this painting

Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida (27 February 1863 – 10 August 1923) was a Spanish painter. Sorolla excelled in the painting of portraits, landscapes, and monumental works of social and historical themes. His most typical works are characterized by a dexterous representation of the people and landscape under the sunlight of his native land. More on Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida

Fabienne Delacroix

Bord de l’eau à Dieppe

Acrylic on Board

8.5″x6.5″

Private collection

Dieppe is a coastal community in the Arrondissement of Dieppe in the Seine-Maritime department in the Normandy region of northern France. 

A port on the English Channel, at the mouth of the Arques river. Dieppe also has a popular pebbled beach, a 15th-century castle and the churches of Saint-Jacques and Saint-Remi. More on Dieppe

 

Fabienne Delacroix is the youngest child of the master naïf painter Michel Delacroix. She began to paint at the age of ten, working along side her father in his studio. Her talent was evident almost immediately. At twelve years old, her paintings were exhibited in a gallery in Carmel, California where the work completely sold out. In 2004, Fabienne began exhibiting on her own, and while her work can be linked stylistically to her father’s, she is very much an artist in her own right. She has a mastery of light and color that is similar to that of French Impressionists. Until recently, Fabienne was known mainly for her seascapes and pastoral landscapes. Fabienne continues to paint the French countryside, seaside and sometimes even Boston with her signature flair. She currently lives and works in Paris, France. More on Fabienne Delacroix

Naïve art is recognized, and often imitated, for its childlike simplicity and frankness.[4] Paintings of this kind typically have a flat rendering style with a rudimentary expression of perspective. More on Naïve art

Fabienne Delacroix

la jetée de Trouville

Acrylic on Board

10.5″x13.75″

Private collection

Trouville-sur-Mer, commonly referred to as Trouville, is a commune in the Calvados department in the Normandy region in northwestern France.

Trouville-sur-Mer borders Deauville. This village of fishermen is a popular tourist attraction in Normandy.

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10 Classic Works of Art, Marine Paintings – With Footnotes, #34

Montague Dawson, 1890 – 1973

Ships That Pass

oil on canvas

28.25 x 42 in

Private collection

Montague Dawson RMSA, FRSA (1890–1973) was a British painter who was renowned as a maritime artist. His most famous paintings depict sailing ships, usually clippers or warships of the 18th and 19th centuries. Montague was the son of a keen yachtsman and the grandson of the marine painter Henry Dawson (18111878), born in Chiswick, London. Much of his childhood was spent on Southampton Water where he was able to indulge his interest in the study of ships. For a brief period around 1910 Dawson worked for a commercial art studio in Bedford Row, London, but with the outbreak of the First World War he joined the Royal Navy. Whilst serving with the Navy in Falmouth he met Charles Napier Hemy (18411917), who considerably influenced his work. In 1924 Dawson was the official artist for an Expedition to the South Seas by the steam yacht St.George. During the expedition he provided illustrated reports to the Graphic magazine.

After the War, Dawson established himself as a professional marine artist, concentrating on historical subjects and portraits of deep-water sailing ships. During the Second World War, he was employed as a war artist. Dawson exhibited regularly at the Royal Society of Marine Artists, of which he became a member, from 1946 to 1964, and occasionally at the Royal Academy between 1917 and 1936. By the 1930s he was considered one of the greatest living marine artists, whose patrons included two American Presidents, Dwight D Eisenhower and Lyndon B Johnson, as well as the British Royal Family. Also in the 1930s, he moved to Milford-Upon-Sea in Hampshire, living there for many years. Dawson is noted for the strict accuracy in the nautical detail of his paintings which often sell for six figures.

The work of Montague Dawson is represented in the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich and the Royal Naval Museum, Portsmouth. More on Montague Dawson

Edward William Cooke, 1811 – 1880

DUTCH FISHING BOATS IN CHOPPY COASTAL WATERS

Oil on canvas

54 x 79cm

Private collection

Edward William Cooke, R.A., F.R.S., F.Z.S., F.S.A., F.G.S. (27 March 1811 – 4 January 1880) was an English landscape and marine painter, and gardener. Cooke was born in Pentonville, London. He was raised in the company of artists. He was a precocious draughtsman and a skilled engraver from an early age, displayed an equal preference for marine subjects and published his “Shipping and Craft”  a series of accomplished engravings  when he was 18, in 1829. Cooke began painting in oils in 1833, and first exhibited at the Royal Academy and British Institution in 1835, by which time his style was essentially formed.

He went on to travel and paint with great industry at home and abroad, indulging his love of the 17th-century Dutch marine artists with a visit to the Netherlands in 1837. He returned regularly over the next 23 years, studying the effects of the coastal landscape and light, as well as the works of the country’s Old Masters, resulting in highly successful paintings. He went on to travel in Scandinavia, Spain, North Africa and, above all, to Venice. In 1858, he was elected into the National Academy of Design as an Honorary Academician. . More Edward William Cooke

Willem van de Velde the Younger, LEIDEN 1633 – 1707 LONDON

THE ENGLISH ROYAL YACHT MARY ABOUT TO FIRE A SALUTEc. 1660

Oil on canvas

126.5 x 178 cm.; 49 3/4  x 70 in.

Private collection

 King Charles II’s Royal Yacht Mary, the subject of this picture, occupies the centre of the composition, about to fire a salute. The Master can be seen ringing a bell to give the order, and the gunner (wearing a fisherman’s hat) can be seen with his lighted spill held aloft. The yacht is moored by its starboard anchor, while a sailor holds the stock of the port anchor, which is unshipped, perhaps as he prepares to stow it. The foresail is up and the mainsail is gathered, ready to be released, and it looks as if the Mary is making ready to depart. Her salute is presumably in answer to one fired by the unidentified Dutch ship beyond and to the left. Further Dutch ships are to be seen in the distance to the centre, including one flying the flag of the Fore Squadron, and another the flag and pennant of an Admiral of the Main. Nearer, to the right, is the Amsterdam ship Hollandia, her stern towards the viewer, smoke visible above her deck suggesting that she to her stern towards the viewer, smoke visible above her deck suggesting that she too has just fired a salute. Beyond the Hollandia is an unidentified ship with a haloed saint on her tafferel.

Van de Velde depicted the Mary in several other paintings, though never so prominently as here. More on this painting

Willem van de Velde the Younger (bapt. 18 December 1633; died 6 April 1707) was a Dutch marine painter. A son of Willem van de Velde the Elder, also a painter of sea-pieces, he was instructed by his father, and afterwards by Simon de Vlieger, a marine painter of repute at the time, and had achieved great celebrity by his art before he came to London. By 1673 he had moved to England, where he was engaged by Charles II, at a salary of £100, to aid his father in “taking and making draughts of sea-fights”, his part of the work being to reproduce in color the drawings of the elder Van de Velde. He was also patronized by the Duke of York and by various members of the nobility. More on Willem van de Velde the Younger

Willem van de Velde the Younger, LEIDEN 1633 – 1707 LONDON

THE ENGLISH ROYAL YACHT MARY ABOUT TO FIRE A SALUTE, c. 1660

Detail

Willem van de Velde the Younger (bapt. 18 December 1633; died 6 April 1707) was a Dutch marine painter. A son of Willem van de Velde the Elder, also a painter of sea-pieces, he was instructed by his father, and afterwards by Simon de Vlieger, a marine painter of repute at the time, and had achieved great celebrity by his art before he came to London. By 1673 he had moved to England, where he was engaged by Charles II, at a salary of £100, to aid his father in “taking and making draughts of sea-fights”, his part of the work being to reproduce in color the drawings of the elder Van de Velde. He was also patronized by the Duke of York and by various members of the nobility. More on Willem van de Velde the Younger

Edward William Cooke, 1811 – 1880

DUTCH FISHING BOATS IN CHOPPY COASTAL WATERS

Detail

Edward William Cooke, see above

HAYLEY LEVER, 1876 – 1958

Returning Fisherman, The Jetties, Manasquan, NJ, c. 1938

Oil on canvas 

30 by 36 inches (76.2 by 91.4 cm)

Private collection

The Manasquan Inlet is an inlet that connects the Atlantic Ocean with the Manasquan River, in the state of New Jersey. Passage to Bay Head Harbor and the Barnegat Bay is possible via the Point Pleasant Canal.

The Manasquan inlet historically had always been shallow, which made it difficult for large boats to navigate. When the Point Pleasant Canal was dug in 1926, the Manasquan river’s water rapidly flowed through the man-made opening disrupting the natural flow of the river, this caused the inlet to completely close with sand for several years. In 1930 work begun to reopen the inlet. The Army Corps of Engineers put up temporary piers and began building jetties. The jetties were constructed with rock excavation from the Second Avenue Subway in Manhattan. The inlet was officially reopened on August 29, 1931. More on The Manasquan Inlet

 

Richard Hayley Lever (28 September 1875 – 6 December 1958) was an Australian-American painter, etcher, lecturer and art teacher. He excelled in painting classes at Prince Alfred College under James Ashton and on leaving school continued to study under Ashton at his Norwood art school. He was a charter member of the Adelaide Easel Club in 1892.

Lever left to England in 1899 to further his career in painting. He moved to St. Ives, a fishing port and artistic colony on the Cornish coast. In St. Ives, Lever shared a studio with Frederick Waugh, and studied painting techniques under the Impressionists Olsson and Algernon Talmage. Lever also painted in the French port villages of Douarnenez and Concarneau, Brittany, directly across the English Channel from St. Ives.

Lever arrived in New York City in 1912 and painted views of the Hudson River, Times Square and Central Park. Upon discovering the American east coast, he painted in Gloucester, MA for several summers and at Marblehead, MA. From 1919 to 1931, Lever taught art classes at the Art Students League of New York where he maintained a Gloucester studio and often traveled to paint on Nantucket and Martha’s Vineyard. In 1924, Lever was commissioned to paint a portrait of the presidential yacht, Mayflower, which was subsequently presented to President Calvin Coolidge in the Cabinet Room of the White House.

In later life, Lever was inflicted with arthritis in his right hand, which prevented him from further travel and forced him to concentrate on still-life subjects instead. As his arthritis advanced, he taught himself to paint with his left hand. However, following the death of his wife Aida in 1949, Lever was confined to his home, where he continued to paint from 1953 until his death. More on Richard Hayley Lever

Irma Stern (1894 – 1966)

Madeira Scene, 1931

Gouache

28.5 x 22 cm

Private collection

Madeira is a Portuguese archipelago situated in the north Atlantic Ocean, southwest of Portugal. Its total population was estimated in 2011 at 267,785. The capital of Madeira is Funchal, located on the main island’s south coast.

Madeira was claimed by Portuguese sailors in the service of Prince Henry the Navigator in 1419 and settled after 1420. The archipelago is considered to be the first territorial discovery of the exploratory period of the Portuguese Age of Discovery, which extended from 1415 to 1542. More on Madeira

Irma Stern (1894, Schweizer-Reneke, Transvaal – 23 August 1966, Cape Town, South Africa) was born in Schweizer-Reneke, a small town in the Transvaal. Her father was interned in a concentration camp by the British during the South African War because of his pro-Boer leanings. Irma and her younger brother, Rudi, were thus taken to Cape Town by their mother. After the war, the family returned to Germany and constant travel. This travel would influence Irma’s work.

Irma Stern, (1894 – 1966)

Boats, Madeira, c. 1951

Gouache and charcoal on paper

37 x 27.5 cm

Private collection

In 1913 Stern studied art in Germany at the Weimar Academy. She was associated with the German Expressionist painters of this period. She held her first exhibition in Berlin in 1919. In 1920 Stern returned to Cape Town with her family where she was first derided and dismissed as an artist before becoming an established artist by the 1940s.

In 1926 she married Dr Johannes Prinz, her former tutor, who subsequently became professor of German at the University of Cape Town. They were divorced in 1934.

Irma Stern travelled extensively in Europe and explored Southern Africa, Zanzibar and the Congo region. These trips provided a wide range of subject matter for her paintings and gave her opportunities to acquire and assemble a collection of artifacts. In 1931 she visited Madeira and Dakar, Senegal, in 1937 and 1938. These expeditions resulted in a wealth of artistic creativity and energy as well as the publication of two illustrated journals; Congo published in 1943 and Zanzibar in 1948.

The Irma Stern Museum was established in 1971 and is the house the artist lived in for almost four decades. She moved into The Firs in Rondebosch in 1927 and lived there until her death. Several of the rooms are furnished as she arranged them while upstairs there is a commercial gallery used by contemporary South African artists. More on Irma Stern

Liza Yashyna, Russia

«Evening»

Oil on canvas

35.4 H x 23.6 W x 0.8 in

Private collection

Elizabeth Yashyna was born on 2-nd of August 1987 in Simferopol (Ukraine) in artists’ family. In 2007 graduated from Crimean College of Art of N.S. Samokish. In 2013 graduated from Kiev National Academy of Fine Art and Architecture (Faculty of Sacred and Monumental Art; studio of N.A. Storozhenko). Exhibition activity began in 2003 – held more than 30 personal and group exhibitions. Member of National Union of Artists of Ukraine and National Union of Artists of Russia. Works are presented in private collections in France, Italy, USA, Hungary, Montenegro, Australia, Russia, Ukraine and others. Since 2008 – member of the Creative Union of Professional Artists of Russia. Since 2013 – Member of the Creative Union of Professional Artists of Ukraine. More on Elizabeth Yashyna

FRANK MYERS BOGGS, 1855 – 1926

Fish Market, Copenhagen, c. 1924

Oil on canvas 

22 1/8 by 20 1/8 inches (56.1 by 51.1 cm)

Private collection

Copenhagen, originally a Viking fishing village founded in the 10th century, Copenhagen became the capital of Denmark in the early 15th century. Beginning in the 17th century it consolidated its position as a regional centre of power with its institutions, defences and armed forces. More on Copenhagen 

Frank Myers Boggs (* 6. December 1855 in Springfield , Ohio ; † August 8, 1926 in Meudon , Hauts-de-Seine )  was active, and naturalized in France .  He was a painter of urban landscapes, marine. Watercolorist , engraver , draftsman.

Mixing tonalist and impressionist elements, Frank Myers Boggs forged a novel artistic style at the juncture of fin-de-siècle American and European traditions. Born in Ohio, Boggs trained at the École des Beaux-Arts under Jean Léon Gerôme and spent the majority of his life in Paris. There, he accomplished the rare feat of gaining prominence in both the French and American art worlds. By the end of his life, Boggs had essentially transformed himself into a French impressionist: he became a French citizen in 1923 and earned the French Legion of Honor three years later. 

Boggs won a prize from the American Art Association in 1884 and silver medals from the Paris Universal Exposition of 1889 and the Chicago World’s Columbian Exposition of 1893. His paintings are now in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Brooklyn Museum of Art, and Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, as well as the Réunion des Musées Nationaux of Paris, Luxembourg Museum, and Museum of Nantes in France. More on Frank Myers Boggs

Anders Zorn, 1860 – 1920

Summer Entertainment/ Sommarnoje, c. 1886

Watercolor, paper

76 x 54 cm

Private Collection

Anders Leonard Zorn (18 February 1860 – 22 August 1920) was one of Sweden’s foremost artists. He obtained international success as a painter, sculptor and etcher. From 1875 to 1880 Zorn studied at the Royal Swedish Academy of Arts in Stockholm. Members of Stockholm society approached him with commissions. Zorn traveled extensively to London, Paris, the Balkans, Spain, Italy and the United States, becoming an international success as one of the most acclaimed painters of his era. It was primarily his skill as a portrait painter that gained Zorn international acclaim based principally upon his incisive ability to depict the individual character of his model. At 29, he was made a Chevalier de la Légion d’honneur at the Exposition Universelle 1889 Paris World Fair. More Anders Leonard Zorn

Acknowledgement: Sotheby’s and others

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11 CLASSIC WORKS OF ART, MARINE PAINTINGS – WITH FOOTNOTES, #33

Montague Dawson, (1890–1973)

The British Clipper Ship Thermopylae

Watercolor and gouache on paper

16 1/4 x 26 in.

Private Collection

Thermopylae was an extreme composite clipper ship built in 1868 by Walter Hood & Co of Aberdeen, to the design of Bernard Waymouth of London. In 1872, Thermopylae raced the clipper Cutty Sark from Shanghai back to London. Thermopylae won by seven days after Cutty Sark lost her rudder. From 1882 onward, Thermopylae took part in the Australian wool trade; however, on this route Cutty Sark proved faster.

In 1897 she was sold to Portugal for use as a naval training ship and renamed Pedro Nunes. On 13 October 1907, the Portuguese Navy towed her down the Tagus river using two warships, and before Amelia de Orleans, Queen of Portugal, she was torpedoed with full naval honours off Cascais. More on Thermopylae 

Montague Dawson, (1890–1973)

The British Clipper Ship Thermopylae

Detail

Montague Dawson RMSA, FRSA (1890–1973) was a British painter who was renowned as a maritime artist. His most famous paintings depict sailing ships, usually clippers or warships of the 18th and 19th centuries. Montague was the son of a keen yachtsman and the grandson of the marine painter Henry Dawson (18111878), born in Chiswick, London. Much of his childhood was spent on Southampton Water where he was able to indulge his interest in the study of ships. For a brief period around 1910 Dawson worked for a commercial art studio in Bedford Row, London, but with the outbreak of the First World War he joined the Royal Navy. Whilst serving with the Navy in Falmouth he met Charles Napier Hemy (18411917), who considerably influenced his work. In 1924 Dawson was the official artist for an Expedition to the South Seas by the steam yacht St.George. During the expedition he provided illustrated reports to the Graphic magazine.

After the War, Dawson established himself as a professional marine artist, concentrating on historical subjects and portraits of deep-water sailing ships. During the Second World War, he was employed as a war artist. Dawson exhibited regularly at the Royal Society of Marine Artists, of which he became a member, from 1946 to 1964, and occasionally at the Royal Academy between 1917 and 1936. By the 1930s he was considered one of the greatest living marine artists, whose patrons included two American Presidents, Dwight D Eisenhower and Lyndon B Johnson, as well as the British Royal Family. Also in the 1930s, he moved to Milford-Upon-Sea in Hampshire, living there for many years. Dawson is noted for the strict accuracy in the nautical detail of his paintings which often sell for six figures.

The work of Montague Dawson is represented in the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich and the Royal Naval Museum, Portsmouth. More on Montague Dawson

Herbert James Draper, 1863-1920

THE WRATH OF THE SEA GOD

Oil on canvas

 38.5 by 101.5cm., 23 by 40in.

Private Collection

The present picture illustrates an episode from Ovid’s Odyssey as the ship commanded by Odysseus and his men on their return to Ithaca from the Trojan wars, incurs the anger of Poseidon following Odysseus’ slaying of Poseidon’s son, the cyclops Polyphemus. The men struggle against the foaming waters, grappling with the steering oar at the stern and attempting to lower the sails to prevent the ship from capsizing.

The Wrath of the Sea God was the second of a series of classical nautical paintings painted by Draper around the turn of the century. In 1894 he had achieved his first major public success with a painting entitled The Sea Maiden (below), a dramatic scene set on board a fishing-boat as a sea-nymph is hauled aboard in the nets. This picture established Draper’s reputation as a painter of narratives beside the sea, and more specifically on board ships.

Herbert James Draper,  (1863–1920)

The Sea Maiden, c. 1894

Oil on canvas

120 x 217.5 cm. (47.2 x 85.6 in.)

 Formerly in the collection of the Royal Cornwall Museum in Truror,

Herbert James Draper (1863 – 1920) was an English Classicist painter whose career began in the Victorian era and extended through the first two decades of the 20th century. Born in London, the son of a jeweller, he was educated at Bruce Castle School in Tottenham and then went on to study art at the Royal Academy. He undertook several educational trips to Rome and Paris between 1888 and 1892, having won the Royal Academy Gold Medal and Travelling Studentship in 1889. In the 1890s, he worked as an illustrator, eventually settling in London. He died of arteriosclerosis at the age of 56, in his home on Abbey Road. More on Herbert James Draper

Terrick Williams, 1860-1936

THE QUAYSIDE, CONCARNEAU

Oil on canvas

 35.5 by 61cm., 14 by 24in.

Private Collection

Concarneau (meaning Bay of Cornwall) is a commune in the Finistère department of Brittany in north-western France. It is a walled town on a long island in the center of the harbour. Historically, the town was a centre of shipbuilding and is France’s third most important fishing port. More on Concarneau

John Terrick Williams RA (20 July 1860 – 20 July 1936). Williams was born in Liverpool, England, the son of a businessman. He was educated at Kings College School, London. Determination to become an artist he move to Europe and studied under Charles Verlat in Antwerp and later at the Académie Julian and Jean-Joseph Benjamin-Constant, William-Adolphe Bouguereau and Tony Robert-Fleury in Paris.

Williams focussed on landscape and marine subjects and painted in oil, pastel and watercolour. He travelled extensively and his impressionistic, luminous paintings sought the transient effects of light and reflections in Venice, St. Tropez, Paris, Brittany and St. Ives.

He was elected a member of the Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours in 1904. His work was regularly exhibited at the Royal Academy from 1891. He was elected an Associate of the Royal Academy (A.R.A.) on 18 November 1924, a Royal Academician (R.A.) on 14 February 1933, and a Senior R.A. on 1 January 1936. In 1933 he was also elected President of the RI. He died on his birthday in 1936 aged 76. After his death a memorial exhibition was held at the Fine Art Society in 1937. More on John Terrick Williams

Thomas Somerscales, 1842-1927

A SHIP OF THE LINE 100 YEARS AGO, c. 1900

Oil on canvas

70 by 106cm., 27½ by 42in.

Private Collection

Somerscales depicts the ship hove to with her mainyards backed as whalers approach. In the distance, another ship can be seen with her ‘stun’-sails’ – the additional sails seen extended outside the normal sail plan – set. These were almost obsolete by the twentieth century. 

Thomas Jacques Somerscales (born in Kingston upon Hull on 29 October 1842; died 27 June 1927) was an English marine painter. He is also considered a Chilean painter as he began his career there and many of his landscapes evoke the region.

His father was a shipmaster, who sketched, and his uncle was an amateur painter. However he had no formal training as an artist and originally became a teacher in the Royal Navy. He also traveled around the Pacific and while teaching in Valparaíso he started working as a professional painter. By 1893 he was still referred to as a “little known artist” but had gained some praise. More on Thomas Jacques Somerscales

Thomas Bush Hardy, (1842-1897)

No. 1 Greenwich Pier, Stormy Weather

Oil on canvas

 9.5 x 20in.

Private Collection

Greenwich Pier is a pier on the River Thames in the Royal Borough of Greenwich, London. It was was originally built in the 1880s as a coaling jetty for the former Greenwich gasworks before this closed in the late 1980s. More on Greenwich Pier

Thomas Bush Hardy (1842, Sheffield – 1897, Maida Vale, London) was a British marine painter and watercolourist. As a young man he travelled in the Netherlands and Italy. In 1884 Hardy was elected a Member of the Royal Society of British Artists. He exhibited with the Society and also at the Royal Academy.

His paintings feature coastal scenes in England and the Netherlands, the French Channel ports and the Venetian Lagoon.

Hardy had nine children. His son Dudley Hardy was a painter, illustrator and poster designer. His daughter Dorothy received an MBE after working as a nurse in the First World War. He died on 15 December 1897 in Maida Vale, London. More on Thomas Bush Hardy

Henry Scott Tuke, R.A., R.W.S., 1858-1929

MENDING THE SAILS , c. 1889

Oil on canvas

41 by 30.5cm., 16 by 12in.

Private Collection

Henry Scott Tuke RA RWS (12 June 1858 – 13 March 1929), was an English visual artist; primarily a painter, but also a photographer. His most notable work was in the Impressionist style.

He was born into a Quaker family in Lawrence Street in York. In 1859 the family moved to Falmouth, where where his father, a physician, established a practice. Tuke’s sister and biographer, Maria Tuke Sainsbury (1861–1947).

In 1875, Tuke enrolled in the Slade School of Art under Alphonse Legros and Sir Edward Poynter. Initially his father paid for his tuition but in 1877 Tuke won a scholarship, which allowed him to continue his training at the Slade and in Italy in 1880. From 1881 to 1883 he was in Paris where he met Jules Bastien-Lepage, who encouraged him to paint en plein air. While studying in France, Tuke decided to move to Newlyn Cornwall where many of his Slade and Parisian friends had already formed the Newlyn School of painters. He received several lucrative commissions there, after exhibiting his work at the Royal Academy of Art in London.

In 1885, Tuke returned to Falmouth where many of his major works were produced. Tuke became an established artist and was elected to full membership of the Royal Academy in 1914. Tuke suffered a heart attack in 1928 and died in March, 1929. Today he is remembered mainly for his oil paintings of young men, but in addition to his achievements as a figurative painter, he was an established maritime artist and produced as many portraits of sailing ships as he did human figures. Tuke was a prolific artist—over 1,300 works are listed and more are still being discovered. More Henry Scott Tuke

 

Thomas Bush Hardy (1842-1897)

Shipwrecked

Oil on canvas

91×60 cm

Private Collection

Thomas Bush Hardy (1842-1897), see above

 

Thomas Bush Hardy, (1842-1897)

Shipwrecked

Detail

 

Richard Strong, (American, Late 20th Century)

Unchartered Voyage

Oil on board

50 x 74 inches (127 x 188.0 cm)

Private Collection

Richard Strong was born in 1947 in Lakeland, Florida. He studied graphic arts and photography at the University of South Florida (1971-1975) receiving a scholarship and grant for postgraduate work in conjunction with Graphicstudio. As part of his training he studied under Frank Rampolla, Bruce Marsh, John Catterall, Oscar Bailey, and Theo Wujcik. He also was fortunate enough to work at Graphicstudio in association with the likes of James Rosenquist, Ed Ruscha and Robert Rauchenberg under Tamarind trained master printer Chuck Ringness. More on Richard Strong

Viviane Guy, b. 1952, France

Un monde de tranquillité/ A world of tranquility

Oil on camvas

31 H x 31 W x 1 in

Viviane Guy. Born in 1952 in Bruxelles, Belgium, self-taught, Viviane Guy likes places filled with beauty. Breathing and seducing spaces. Her painter’s vision has brought her through the world particularly in Canada, French Polynesia, China and the U.S.A. where she reinforced her technique working hand to hand with the American painter Jackson Collins. Viviane Guy defines the Art of painting as the continuity of her childhood and considers that her staging have no other function than to tame the viewer in order for them to decode their senses. “In front of nature, a painter chooses how to look at it. I work following the impressions reality leaves in me, they inspire me while preserving my freedom. The subject can be guessed, but the ambiance is abstraction.” Viviane Guy.  More on Vivian Guy

Acknowledgement: HeritageSotheby’s  , and others


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11 CLASSIC WORKS OF ART, MARINE PAINTINGS – WITH FOOTNOTES, #32

Frederick Judd Waugh, American, 1861–1940

Mid Ocean

Oil on canvas

40 × 50 1/4 in. (101.6 × 127.6 cm)

 The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston

Frederick Judd Waugh (September 13, 1861 in Bordentown, New Jersey – September 10, 1940) was an American artist, primarily known as a marine artist. During World War I, he designed ship camouflage for the U.S. Navy, under the direction of Everett L. Warner.

Waugh was the son of a well-known Philadelphia portrait painter, Samuel Waugh. He studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts with Thomas Eakins, and at the Académie Julian in Paris, with Adolphe-William Bouguereau. After leaving Paris, he moved to England, residing on the island of Sark in the English Channel, where he made his living as a seascape painter.

In 1908, Waugh returned to the U.S. and settled in Montclair Heights, New Jersey. He had no studio, until art collector William T. Evans offered him one in exchange for one painting a year. In later years, he lived on Bailey Island, Maine, and in Provincetown, Massachusetts.

In 1918, Waugh was recommended to serve as a camouflage artist (or camoufleur) for the U.S. Navy, as a member of the Design Section of its marine camouflage unit (Behrens 2002, 2009). That section was located in Washington, D.C., and was headed by American painter Everett L. Warner (Warner 1919). More on Frederick Judd Waugh

NICOLAAS RIEGEN,  (Dutch. 1827-1889)

Seascape with Three-Mast Ship on Choppy Water

Oil on Canvas

22” by 23”.

Private collection

Nicolaas Riegen was born in Amsterdam, May 31, 1827, where he continued to live and work for the rest of his life. Riegen was a skilled painter of seascapes and river views, of various weather conditions. He was known to have painted city views and landscapes according to the Hague School as well. Riegen exhibited his work during his life at events in Arnhem and Maastricht. Although he was a registered painter, and thus a professional, his work is seldom seen. In 1872 he applied to “Arti et Amicitiae” in Amsterdam. In 1899 Riegen passed away. More on Nicolaas Riegen

THOMAS BUSH HARDY C.19TH

MOUTH OF THE THAMES, c. 1896

WATERCOLOR ON BOARD

Height: 16 & 11 in. by Width: 33 & 28 in.

Private collection

The Thames Estuary is the estuary in which the River Thames meets the waters of the North Sea, in the south-east of Great Britain. It is not easy to define the limits of the estuary.[ Although physically the head of Sea Reach or the Kent / Essex Strait, south of Canvey Island on the northern (Essex) shore presents a western boundary, the Tideway itself can be considered estuarine; it starts in south-west London at Teddington/Ham. The eastern boundary of the estuary is a line drawn from North Foreland, Margate, Kent via the Kentish Knock lighthouse to Harwich in Essex. It is to this line that the typical estuarine sandbanks extend. More on MOUTH OF THE THAMES

 

THOMAS BUSH HARDY C.19TH, see below

 

Montague Dawson RMSA, FRSA (1890–1973)

Ships That Pass

Oil on canvas

28.25 x 42 in

Private collection

Montague Dawson RMSA, FRSA (1890–1973) was a British painter who was renowned as a maritime artist. His most famous paintings depict sailing ships, usually clippers or warships of the 18th and 19th centuries. Montague was the son of a keen yachtsman and the grandson of the marine painter Henry Dawson (18111878), born in Chiswick, London. Much of his childhood was spent on Southampton Water where he was able to indulge his interest in the study of ships. For a brief period around 1910 Dawson worked for a commercial art studio in Bedford Row, London, but with the outbreak of the First World War he joined the Royal Navy. Whilst serving with the Navy in Falmouth he met Charles Napier Hemy (18411917), who considerably influenced his work. In 1924 Dawson was the official artist for an Expedition to the South Seas by the steam yacht St.George. During the expedition he provided illustrated reports to the Graphic magazine.

Montague Dawson RMSA, FRSA (1890–1973)

THE OLD VOYAGER HUDSON HALF MOON – 1609

oil on canvas

20″ x 30.25″ — 50.8 x 76.8 cm.

Private collection

Halve Maen (Dutch pronunciation) was a Dutch East India Company vlieboot which sailed into what is now New York Harbor in September 1609. She was commissioned by the VOC Chamber of Amsterdam in the Dutch Republic to covertly find a western passage to China. The ship was captained by Henry Hudson, an Englishman in the service of the Dutch Republic. More on Halve Maen

After the War, Dawson established himself as a professional marine artist, concentrating on historical subjects and portraits of deep-water sailing ships. During the Second World War, he was employed as a war artist. Dawson exhibited regularly at the Royal Society of Marine Artists, of which he became a member, from 1946 to 1964, and occasionally at the Royal Academy between 1917 and 1936. By the 1930s he was considered one of the greatest living marine artists, whose patrons included two American Presidents, Dwight D Eisenhower and Lyndon B Johnson, as well as the British Royal Family. Also in the 1930s, he moved to Milford-Upon-Sea in Hampshire, living there for many years. Dawson is noted for the strict accuracy in the nautical detail of his paintings which often sell for six figures.

The work of Montague Dawson is represented in the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich and the Royal Naval Museum, Portsmouth. More on Montague Dawson

THOMAS BUSH HARDY, C.19TH

MOUTH OF THE THAMES, c. 1896

WATERCOLOR ON BOARD

Height: 16 & 11 in. by Width: 33 & 28 in.

Private collection

Thomas Bush Hardy (1842, Sheffield – 1897, Maida Vale, London) was a British marine painter and watercolourist. As a young man he travelled in the Netherlands and Italy. In 1884 Hardy was elected a Member of the Royal Society of British Artists. He exhibited with the Society and also at the Royal Academy.

His paintings feature coastal scenes in England and the Netherlands, the French Channel ports and the Venetian Lagoon.

Hardy had nine children. His son Dudley Hardy was a painter, illustrator and poster designer. His daughter Dorothy received an MBE after working as a nurse in the First World War. He died on 15 December 1897 in Maida Vale, London. More on Thomas Bush Hardy

 

 Samuel Bough, English (1822 – 1878)

Off St Andrews, c. 1856

Oil on canvas

36.20 x 45.80 cm

National Galleries of Scotland

This dramatically lit scene shows a view just off the harbour of St Andrews, looking back towards the town. The remains of the ruined Cathedral can be seen perched on the hill. They form a backdrop to the foreground drama of the fishing boat venturing out into the turbulent waters of St Andrews Bay, notorious for its heavy swell and frequent shipwrecks. Benefitting from improvements in rail connections across Scotland, Bough made frequent excursions to the coastal towns and villages of the East Neuk of Fife from the 1850s to the 1870s. This painting was completed in 1856, the same year that Bough was elected an Associate of the Royal Scottish Academy. More on this painting

Samuel Bough RSA (1822–1878) was an English-born landscape painter who spent much of his career working in Scotland. He was raised in relative poverty, but with a keen encouragement in the arts.

He was self-taught but mixed with local artists such as Richard Harrington and George Sheffield, and was strongly influenced by the work of Turner. After an unsuccessful attempt to live as an artist in Carlisle he obtained a job and as a theatre scenery painter in Manchester in 1845, and later in Glasgow. Encouraged by Daniel Macnee to take up landscape painting he moved to Hamilton from 1851-4 and worked there. In 1854 he moved to Port Glasgow to work on his technique of painting ships and harbours. He also began supplementing his income by illustrating books, before moving to Edinburgh in 1855.

His health began to fail in 1877 and in January 1878 he suffered a stroke. He died of prostate cancer. More on Samuel Bough RSA

Edward Cucuel, 1875 – 1954

THE GATEWAY TO AMERICA (FROM GOVERNOR’S ISLAND), c. 1928

Oil on canvas

25 3/4 by 31 3/4 inches, (65.4 by 80.6 cm)

Private collection

In the present picture Cucuel illustrates southern Manhattan from a vantage point on Governor’s Island. At right is Castle Williams, a circular fortification on the northwest point of the island and part of a system of forts constructed in the early 19th century to protect New York City from naval attack. Other structures visible in the skyline include the Woolworth Building, the International Mercantile Marine Company and the Whitehall Building. More on this painting

Edward Cucuel (August 6, 1875, San Francisco – April 18, 1954, Pasadena, California), was an American-born painter who lived and worked in Germany. At the age of fourteen he was already attending the San Francisco Art Institute and doing illustrations for The Examiner. At the age of seventeen, he went to Paris where he attended the Académie Julian and the Académie Colarossi, finishing at the Académie des Beaux-Arts under Jean-Léon Gérôme. When he came back to the United States in 1896, he briefly worked as a newspaper illustrator in New York, but returned to France and Italy to acquaint himself with the old masters at first hand. He ended up in Germany in 1899, where he worked as a free-lance newspaper illustrator in Berlin and Leipzig.

Following a brief stay in San Francisco to visit his family after the earthquake, he settled in Munich in 1907. It was there that he was introduced to plein-air painting. He also became a member of the Munich Secession. In 1913, he became a member of the Société Nationale des Beaux-Arts and exhibited with the Salon d’Automne. During the First World War, he lived in Holzhausen on the Ammersee, later establishing studios in Munich and Starnberg, his father’s hometown. From 1928 to 1939, he commuted between there and New York, where he spent the winters. The beginning of World War Two forced him to leave Germany for good in 1939. He settled in Pasadena, California, where he lived until his death in 1954. More on Edward Cucuel

Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida,  (1863 – 1923)

RECOGIENDO LA BARCA, PLAYA DE VALENCIA (THE RETURN OF THE BOAT, VALENCIA BEACH), 1909

oil on canvas

16 by 24cm., 6¼ by 9½in

Private collection

Valencia is one of the oldest cities in Spain, founded in the Roman period under the name (Valentia Edetanorum es) on the site of a former Iberian town, by the river Turia in the province of Edetania,  fronting the Gulf of Valencia on the Mediterranean Sea. More on Valencia

Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida (27 February 1863 – 10 August 1923) was a Spanish painter. Sorolla excelled in the painting of portraits, landscapes, and monumental works of social and historical themes. His most typical works are characterized by a dexterous representation of the people and landscape under the sunlight of his native land. More on Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida

Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida,  (1863 – 1923)

On San Sebastian Beach, c. 1895-1900

Oil on Canvas

32.7 cm (12.87 in.)x 22.7 cm (8.94 in.)

A Repository of Paintings Archive

San Sebastian is a coastal city and municipality located in the Basque Autonomous Community, Spain. It lies on the coast of the Bay of Biscay, and boasts one of the best in-city beaches in Europe. It is quite unusual feeling that you can sunbathe and swim right next to major historical buildings and churches. Surfers are in abundance here. The city is quite small and cozy. More on San Sebastian

Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida,  (1863 – 1923), see above

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13 Classic Works of Art, Marine Paintings – With Footnotes, #31

FOLLOWER OF ANGE-JOSEPH-ANTOINE ROUX, (french 1765-1835) 

“ACTION BETWEEN H.M FRIGATE ”AMBUSCADE” AND THE FRENCH FRIGATE ”BAYONNAISE”” 

Oil on canvas 

23 3/8 x 30 in. (59.4 x 76.2cm)

Private Collection

HMS Ambuscade was a 32-gun fifth-rate frigate of the Royal Navy, built in 1773. The French captured her in 1798 but the British recaptured her in 1803. She was broken up in 1810.

On 13 December 1798, Ambuscade captured a French merchantman, Faucon, with a cargo of sugar and coffee bound for Bordeaux. Disaster struck the following day. Ambuscade was blockading Rochefort, when the smaller French corvette Bayonnaise captured her at the Action of 14 December 1798. The court martial exonerated Captain Henry Jenkins of Ambuscade, though a good case could be made that he exhibited poor leadership and ship handling. The French brought her into service as Embuscade.

On 28 May 1803, HMS Victory recaptured her. She had a crew of 187 men under the command of capitaine de vaisseau Fradin, and was 30 days out of Cap Francais, bound for Rochefort. The Royal Navy took her back into service as Ambuscade.

In March 1805, she was attached to Sir James Craig’s military expedition to Italy. Along with Dragon, Craig’s flagship, and Lively, Ambuscade escorted a fleet of transports to Malta. On 4 March 1807, Ambuscade captured the ship Istria. Unité, Melpomene, Bittern and Weazel (or Weazle) were in company and shared in the prize money. More on the Ambuscade

Jean François Hue, (French, 1751-1823)

French corvette Bayonnaise boarding HMS Ambuscade during the Action of 14 December 1798

Bayonnaise was a 24-gun corvette of the French Navy, launched in 1793. Bayonnaise was being built as a privateer when the Ministry of Marine requisitioned her in 1793 before she sailed. The Ministry assumed the construction contracts and purchased her in March 1794. Her hull was coppered in 1795 in Brest. She was officially renamed Brême that year, but apparently the new name was roundly ignored.

She became famous for the Action of 14 December 1798, in which she captured the much stronger 32-gun Ambuscade off the Gironde. Ambuscade was blockading Rochefort, when the smaller Bayonnaise captured her. Ambuscade had ten men killed, including her first lieutenant and master, and 36 wounded, including her captain. Bayonnaise had 30 killed, and 30 badly wounded, including Richer and his first lieutenant.

On 28 November 1803, Ardent gave chase to Bayonnaise in Finisterre Bay. The corvette’s crew ran her ashore and then set fire to her prevent the British from capturing her. Captain Winthrop of Ardent described Bayonnaise as a frigate of 32 guns and 220 men, which had been sailing from Havana to Ferrol. Actually, Bayonnaise was armed en flute with only six 8-pounder guns, and was returning from the Antilles.

Archaeologists of the “Finisterre Project” in August 2010 located Bayonnaise’s wreck on Langosteira beach, Finisterre. More on the Bayonnaise

Ange-Joseph Antoine Roux, “Antoine Roux” (1765–1835) was a French fine art painter who specialised in maritime painting, sometimes referred to as marine art. Roux came from a family of artists and primarily worked in Marseille. Early in life he was apprenticed to his father, Joseph Roux (1752–93), an hydrographer as well as an artist in his own right, spending his leisure hours painting and drawing. He died of cholera in Marseille in 1835. More Roux

Jean-François Hue ( Saint-Arnoult-en-Yvelines , December 2, 1751 – Paris, 26 December 1823) was a French landscape painter of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. He was received at the Royal Academy in 1782. His main sources of inspiration for his works are his great voyages.

He entered the studio of Joseph Vernet as a painter and landscape designer; He painted four views of the castle of Mousseaux and it’s gardens.

Having specialized in landscapes and marines, his talent allowed him to become an official Navy painter, following in the footsteps of his master Joseph Vernet . Thus, in 1791 , the Constituent Assembly entrusted him with the task of completing the series representing the ports of France, commissioned at Vernet from 1753 .

Between 1792 and 1798 , he executed a series of six paintings on the theme of the ports of Brittany . More on Jean-François Hue

Thomas Bush Hardy

Scarborough, c. 1895

watercolour

22cm x 71cm

Private Collection

Scarborough is a town on the North Sea coast of North Yorkshire, England. The town lies between 10–230 feet (3–70 m) above sea level, rising steeply northward and westward from the harbour onto limestone cliffs. 


The most striking feature of the town’s geography is a high rocky promontory pointing eastward into the North Sea. The promontory supports the 11th century ruins of Scarborough Castle and separates the seafront into two bays, to the north and south. More on Scarborough 

Thomas Bush Hardy (1842, Sheffield – 1897, Maida Vale, London) was a British marine painter and watercolourist. As a young man he travelled in the Netherlands and Italy. In 1884 Hardy was elected a Member of the Royal Society of British Artists. He exhibited with the Society and also at the Royal Academy.

His paintings feature coastal scenes in England and the Netherlands, the French Channel ports and the Venetian Lagoon.

Hardy had nine children. His son Dudley Hardy was a painter, illustrator and poster designer. His daughter Dorothy received an MBE after working as a nurse in the First World War. He died on 15 December 1897 in Maida Vale, London. More on Thomas Bush Hardy

Charles Dixon, 1872 – 1934

In Mid Atlantic, c. 1921

Watercolour heightened with body colour

43.5cm x 76.5cm

Private Collection

Charles Edward Dixon (8 December 1872 – 12 September 1934) was a British maritime painter of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, whose work was highly successful and regularly exhibited at the Royal Academy. Several of his paintings are held by the National Maritime Museum and he was a regular contributing artist to magazines and periodicals. He lived at Itchenor in Sussex and died in 1934. More on Charles Edward Dixon

Charles Dixon, 1872 – 1934

Tower Bridge, 1910

Watercolour and bodycolour on paper on paper

535 x 372mm

Private Collection

Tower Bridge is a combined bascule and suspension bridge in London built between 1886 and 1894. The bridge crosses the River Thames close to the Tower of London. 

In the second half of the 19th century, an advertisement in the East End of London led to a hiring for a new river crossing downstream of London Bridge. A traditional fixed bridge at street level could not be built because it would cut off access by sailing ships to the port facilities in the Pool of London, between London Bridge and the Tower of London. More on the Tower Bridge

Charles Dixon, 1872 – 1934, see above

Lyonel Feininger, 1910 – 2011

Romance at the seaside, 1943

Watercolour and ink on paper

24 x 31.5 cm.

Private Collection

T. Lux Feininger (June 11, 1910 Berlin — July 7, 2011 Cambridge) was an American painter, avant-garde photographer, author, and art teacher who was born in Berlin to Julia Berg and Lyonel Charles Feininger, an American living in Germany from the age of sixteen. His father was the first faculty appointment made to the Bauhaus in Weimar by its founder, Walter Gropius, in 1919. He had two older full brothers, including Andreas Feininger, and two half sisters, even older, by Clara Fürst and his father (from his first marriage). More Lyonel Feininger 

Lyonel Feininger, 1910 – 2011

Untitled – sailing boat, c. 1934

ink, watercolour on paper

16.1 x 19 cm

Private Collection

Lyonel Feininger, 1910 – 2011, see above

William Lee Hankey, (1869–1952) 

Sardine Boats at Douarnenez, France

Oil on canvas

63 x 76cm (24 3/4 x 29 7/8in.)

Private Collection

Douarnenez, is a commune in the Finistère department of Brittany in north-western France. It is located at the mouth of the Pouldavid River, an estuary on the southern shore of Douarnenez Bay in the Atlantic Ocean. It still has fish canning facilities (sardines and mackerel) although sardine fishing, for which the town became famous, has fallen off in recent years.

Douarnenez has a growing tourist industry, with numerous visitors attracted annually to its pleasant location and warm climate, and also because of its marinas, maritime museum, regattas and sandy beaches. The island of Tristan off Douarnenez can be reached by foot at low tide. It is linked to the legend of Tristan and Iseult from the times of King Arthur. More on Douarnenez

William Lee Hankey (1869–1952) RWS,RI,ROI,RE,NS was a British painter and book illustrator. He specialised in landscapes, character studies and portraits of pastoral life, particularly in studies of mothers with young children.

He was born in Chester and worked as a designer after leaving school. He studied art in the evenings at the Chester School of Art, then at the Royal College of Art. Later in Paris he became influenced by the work of Jules Bastien-Lepage, who also favoured rustic scenes depicted in a realistic but sentimental style. He first exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1896 and was President of the London Sketch Club from 1902 to 1904. He stayed in France in the early 1900s, painting many of his works in Brittany and Normandy. From 1904 until well after World War I he maintained a studio at the Etaples art colony.

It was Hankey’s black and white and coloured etchings of the people of Étaples, which gained him a reputation as ‘one of the most gifted of the figurative printmakers working in original drypoint during the first thirty years of the 20th century’. One that is particularly striking for its stylistic presentation was “The Refugees”, his contribution to raising awareness of the consequences for ordinary people of the German invasion of France and Belgium in 1914. He went on to serve with the Artists’ Rifles from 1915 to 1918.

In Britain he had been associated with the Newlyn School, a group of English artists based in the titular village in Cornwall who were themselves influenced by the romantic poets such as Wordsworth and Keats. More on William Lee Hankey

Michael Peter Ancher  (1849–1927)

The Lifeboat is Taken through the Dunes, c. 1883

Oil on canvas

171 × 221 cm (67.3 × 87 in)

Museum for Kunst,  Copenhagen

Michael Peter Ancher (9 June 1849 – 19 September 1927) was a Danish realist artist. He is remembered above all for his paintings of fishermen and other scenes from the Danish fishing community in Skagen. Ancher was born on the island of Bornholm. He attended school in Rønne but was unable to complete his secondary education as his father ran into financial difficulties. In 1866, he met the painters Theodor Philipsen and Vilhelm Groth. Impressed with his own early work, they encouraged him to take up painting as a profession. In 1871, he spent a short period at C.V Nielsen’s art school as a preliminary to joining the Royal Danish Academy of Art in Copenhagen later in the year. Although he spent some time at the academy, he left in 1875 without graduating.

Michael Peter Ancher  (1849–1927)

Will he round the point? c. 1885

Oil on canvas

110×142 cm.

Private Collection

He achieved his artistic breakthrough in 1879 with the painting Vil han klare pynten (Will He Round the Point?) (above). Michael Ancher’s works depict Skagen’s heroic fishermen and their dramatic experiences at sea. More on Michael Peter Ancher 

N. C. Wyeth, 1882 – 1945

Deep Cove Lobster Man, ca.1938

Oil on gessoed board (Renaissance Panel)

16 1/4 x 22 3/4 in.

Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Newell Convers Wyeth (October 22, 1882 – October 19, 1945), known as N. C. Wyeth, was an American artist and illustrator. During his lifetime, Wyeth created over 3,000 paintings and illustrated 112 books, 25 of them for Scribner’s, the Scribner Classics, which is the work for which he is best known. The first of these, Treasure Island, was one of his masterpieces and the proceeds paid for his studio. Wyeth was a realist painter just as the camera and photography began to compete with his craft. Sometimes seen as melodramatic, his illustrations were designed to be understood quickly. He is notably the father of painter Andrew Wyeth and the grandfather of Jamie Wyeth, both celebrated American painters. More on Newell Convers Wyeth

Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida, 1863 – 1923

Breakwater, San Sebastian, 1918

Oil on canvas

81 x 104.5 cm

Sorolla Museum,  Madrid, Spain

San Sebastián is a coastal city and municipality located in the Basque Autonomous Community, Spain. It lies on the coast of the Bay of Biscay, 20 km from the French border. San Sebastián’s picturesque shoreline makes it a popular beach resort. The seaside environment is enhanced by hilly surroundings that are easily accessible. More on San Sebastián

Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida (27 February 1863  10 August 1923) was a Spanish painter. Sorolla excelled in the painting of portraits, landscapes, and monumental works of social and historical themes. His most typical works are characterized by a dexterous representation of the people and landscape under the sunlight of his native land. More on Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida

UNKNOWN (20TH CENTURY)

STEAM SHIP

Oil on panel

8 x 10 in.

Private Collection

 

Artists: ANGE-JOSEPH-ANTOINE ROUX Charles Dixon Jean François Hue Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida Lyonel Feininger N. C. Wyeth Thomas Bush Hardy


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13 Classic Works of Art, Marine Paintings – With Footnotes, #30b

Charles Dixon, 1872 – 1934

The Pool, 1928

Watercolour and gouache

430 mm x 750 mm

Private collection

The Pool of London is a stretch of the River Thames from London Bridge to below Limehouse. Part of the Tideway of the Thames, the Pool was navigable by tall-masted vessels bringing coastal and later overseas goods—the wharves there were the original part of the Port of London. The Pool of London is divided into two parts, the Upper Pool and Lower Pool. The Upper Pool consists of the section between London Bridge and the Cherry Garden Pier in Bermondsey. The Lower Pool runs from the Cherry Garden Pier to Limekiln Creek.

Charles Edward Dixon (8 December 1872 – 12 September 1934) was a British maritime painter of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, whose work was highly successful and regularly exhibited at the Royal Academy. Several of his paintings are held by the National Maritime Museum and he was a regular contributing artist to magazines and periodicals. He lived at Itchenor in Sussex and died in 1934. More on Charles Edward Dixon

 

Charles Dixon, 1872 – 1934

THE LOWER POOL, 1909

Watercolour, heightened with white

31cm x 48cm (12in x 19in)

Private collection

Charles Edward Dixon (8 December 1872 – 12 September 1934), see above

Montague Dawson, 1890 – 1973

The Torrens in California Waters

oil on canvas

28 × 42 in

Private collection

Torrens (1875 – 1910) was a clipper ship designed to carry passengers and cargo between London and Port Adelaide, South Australia. She was the fastest ship to sail on that route

It is likely that the vessel was named in honour of Colonel Robert Torrens, a principal exponent of the economic benefits of nineteenth-century colonial trade. 

The Torrens was aimed at the upper end of the market – accommodation was first and second class passengers only. Apart from the crew, she carried “a surgeon, a stewardess and a good cow”

She lost her foremast and main topmast in 1891, and while being refitting in Pernambuco a fire broke out on board. On the evening of 11 January 1899 she struck an iceberg some 40 km south west of the Crozet Islands and limped into Adelaide dismasted, with her bow stoved in. In 1906 the Torrens was sold for £1,500 (she cost £27,257 to build) to an Italian shipping line, but after running her ashore, she was sent to the shipbreakers. They were however so taken by her aesthetic appearance that they refused to break her up, and repaired her instead. But it was not long before she again ran aground. She was finally broken up at Genoa in 1910. More on the Torrens 

Montague Dawson RMSA, FRSA (1890–1973) was a British painter who was renowned as a maritime artist. His most famous paintings depict sailing ships, usually clippers or warships of the 18th and 19th centuries. Montague was the son of a keen yachtsman and the grandson of the marine painter Henry Dawson (18111878), born in Chiswick, London. Much of his childhood was spent on Southampton Water where he was able to indulge his interest in the study of ships. For a brief period around 1910 Dawson worked for a commercial art studio in Bedford Row, London, but with the outbreak of the First World War he joined the Royal Navy. Whilst serving with the Navy in Falmouth he met Charles Napier Hemy (18411917), who considerably influenced his work. In 1924 Dawson was the official artist for an Expedition to the South Seas by the steam yacht St.George. During the expedition he provided illustrated reports to the Graphic magazine.

After the War, Dawson established himself as a professional marine artist, concentrating on historical subjects and portraits of deep-water sailing ships. During the Second World War, he was employed as a war artist. Dawson exhibited regularly at the Royal Society of Marine Artists, of which he became a member, from 1946 to 1964, and occasionally at the Royal Academy between 1917 and 1936. By the 1930s he was considered one of the greatest living marine artists, whose patrons included two American Presidents, Dwight D Eisenhower and Lyndon B Johnson, as well as the British Royal Family. Also in the 1930s, he moved to Milford-Upon-Sea in Hampshire, living there for many years. Dawson is noted for the strict accuracy in the nautical detail of his paintings which often sell for six figures.

The work of Montague Dawson is represented in the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich and the Royal Naval Museum, Portsmouth. More on Montague Dawson

 

Vincent van Gogh,  (1853–1890)

The Stevedores (Arles,1888)

Oil on canvas

54 x 65 cm

Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid

When Vincent van Gogh arrived in Arles in February 1888 seeking the luminous atmosphere of the French Midi, he eschewed pointillist and Impressionist methods in favour of more synthetic forms and louder colours. The Stevedores in Arles, which clearly evidences this stylistic change, is painted with thick, elongated brushstrokes and marked colour contrasts. It shows a view of the Rhone with a blazing sunset in which the motifs of the composition— clearly influenced by Japanese art — stand out against the light. 

The impression this sight made on the artist spurred him to depict it shortly afterwards in three paintings. The first of them, Boats with Sand, features two moored boats viewed from a very oblique, high perspective, as if captured from a very tall quay from which some men unload sand, not coal, in full daylight. Later, perhaps at the end of August, he painted two similar pictures, this time showing the sunset: Coal Barges and the Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza Stevedores in Arles. 

Vincent van Gogh  (1853–1890)

Quay with men unloading sand barges, Arles, August 1888

Oil on canvas

55 × 66 cm (21.7 × 26 in)

Museum Folkwang,  Essen, Germany.

The impression this sight made on the artist spurred him to depict it shortly afterwards in three paintings. The first of them, Boats with Sand (above), features two moored boats viewed from a very oblique, high perspective, as if captured from a very tall quay from which some men unload sand, not coal, in full daylight. Later, perhaps at the end of August, he painted two similar pictures (below), this time showing the sunset: Coal Barges and the Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza Stevedores in Arles. More on van Gogh in Arles

Vincent van Gogh  (1853–1890)

Coal Barges, c. 1888; Arles, Bouches-du-Rhône, France

Style: Post-Impressionism

Oil, canvas

71 x 95 cm

Private Collection

Vincent van Gogh (born March 30, 1853, Zundert, Neth.—died July 29, 1890, Auvers-sur-Oise, near Paris, France). Dutch painter, generally considered the greatest after Rembrandt, and one of the greatest of the Post-Impressionists. The striking colour, emphatic brushwork, and contoured forms of his work powerfully influenced the current of Expressionism in modern art. Van Gogh’s art became astoundingly popular after his death, especially in the late 20th century, when his work sold for record-breaking sums at auctions around the world and was featured in blockbuster touring exhibitions. In part because of his extensive published letters, van Gogh has also been mythologized in the popular imagination as the quintessential tortured artist. More on Vincent van Gogh

Follower of Willem van de Velde the Younger, 1633 – 1707

AN ENGLISH SHIP IN A GALE ATTEMPTING TO LIE-TO

oil on canvas

29 7/8  by 24 7/8  in.; 75.9 by 63.1 cm. 

Private collection

In sailing, lying ahull is a controversial method of weathering a storm, by downing all sails, battening the hatches and locking the tiller to leeward. A sea anchor is not used, allowing the boat to drift freely, completely at the mercy of the storm. More lying ahull

Willem van de Velde the Younger (bapt. 18 December 1633; died 6 April 1707) was a Dutch marine painter. A son of Willem van de Velde the Elder, also a painter of sea-pieces, he was instructed by his father, and afterwards by Simon de Vlieger, a marine painter of repute at the time, and had achieved great celebrity by his art before he came to London. By 1673 he had moved to England, where he was engaged by Charles II, at a salary of £100, to aid his father in “taking and making draughts of sea-fights”, his part of the work being to reproduce in color the drawings of the elder Van de Velde. He was also patronized by the Duke of York and by various members of the nobility. More on Willem van de Velde the Younger

Bonaventura Peeters the Elder, ANTWERP 1614 – 1652 HOBOKEN

VESSELS AND A ROWING BOAT ON CHOPPY WATERS, NEAR A SMALL HARBOR TOWN WITH A WINDMILL, POSSIBLY HOBOKEN

Oil on panel

12 5/8  by 9 5/8  in.; 32.1 by 24.4 cm.

Private collection

Hoboken is a southern district of the arrondissement and city of Antwerp, in the Flemish Region of Belgium. It is located at the Scheldt river. The name of the district has origins in Middle Dutch. Each November an annual beer server race has taken place since 1777. More on Hoboken 

Bonaventura Peeters (I) or Bonaventura Peeters the Elder (23 July 1614 – 25 July 1652) was a Flemish painter, draughtsman and etcher. He became one of the leading marine artists in the Low Countries in the first half of the 17th century with his depictions of marine battles, storms at sea, shipwrecks and views of ships in rivers and harbours.

Nothing is known about his early training. Bonaventura became a master in Antwerp’s Guild of Saint Luke in 1634. On 5 July 1638 he received a commission of the pensionary of Antwerp to produce maps of the Siege of Kallo and Verrebroek which had occurred only one month earlier. He was able to deliver the maps half a month later. This earned him a subsequent commission from the pensionary for a large painting of the Siege of Kallo, which he completed in collaboration with his brother Gillis. He became one of the few marine specialists active in the Southern Netherlands during the mid-17th century.

He moved in 1641 to Hoboken (Antwerp) where he lived in a spacious residence and worked in a studio. Peeters never married and died in Hoboken, aged 38 after suffering from ill health the last years of his life. More on Bonaventura Peeters

 

Bonaventura Peeters the Elder, ANTWERP 1614 – 1652 HOBOKEN

VESSELS AND A ROWING BOAT ON CHOPPY WATERS, NEAR A SMALL HARBOR TOWN WITH A WINDMILL, POSSIBLY HOBOKEN

Detail

Eugène Boudin, 1824 – 1898

LE PORT DU HAVRE AU COUCHER DU SOLEIL, c. 1882

Oil on canvas laid down on board

21 3/8 by 29 1/4 in., 54.3 by 74.3 cm

Private collection

Born in Honfleur and the son of a sailor, Boudin was drawn to the ports and coastline of northern France. The artist’s practice of painting largely en plein air, though often finishing his paintings in the studio, enabled him to endow his works with an energetic immediacy and freshness. As Boudin inscribed in one his notebooks, “Beaches. Produce them from nature as far as is possible… things done on the spot or based on a very recent impression can be considered as direct paintings” Boudin’s art was an important source of inspiration for the next generation of artists, particularly the Impressionists. He was both a friend and mentor of Claude Monet, and is credited with having first shown him the importance of painting in the open air. More on Boudin paintings

Eugène Louis Boudin; 12 July 1824 – 8 August 1898) was one of the first French landscape painters to paint outdoors. Boudin was a marine painter, and expert in the rendering of all that goes upon the sea and along its shores. 

Born at Honfleur, Boudin was the son of a harbor pilot, and at age 10 the young boy worked on a steamboat that ran between Le Havre and Honfleur. In 1835 the family moved to Le Havre, where Boudin’s father opened a store for stationery and picture frames. Here the young Eugene worked, later opening his own small shop. In his shop, in which pictures were framed, Boudin came into contact with artists working in the area and exhibited in the shop their paintings. At the age of 22 he started painting full-time, and traveled to Paris the following year and then through Flanders. In 1850 he earned a scholarship that enabled him to move to Paris, although he often returned to paint in Normandy and, from 1855, made regular trips to Brittany.

In 1857/58 Boudin befriended the young Claude Monet, then only 18, and persuaded him to give up his teenage caricature drawings and to become a landscape painte. The two remained lifelong friends and Monet later paid tribute to Boudin’s early influence. Boudin joined Monet and his young friends in the first Impressionist exhibition in 1873, but never considered himself a radical or innovator.

Late in his life he returned to the south of France as a refuge from ill-health, and recognizing soon that the relief it could give him was almost spent, he returned to his home at Deauville, to die within sight of Channel waters and under the Channel skies he had painted so often. More on Eugène Louis Boudin

 

Eugène Boudin, 1824 – 1898

FÉCAMP, LE BASSIN, c. 1892

Oil on canvas

16 1/4 by 22 1/4 in., 41.3 by 56.5 cm

Private collection

Depicting the port of Fécamp, in Seine-Maritime in Upper Normandy, the present work is a testament to Boudin’s favorite subject and to his mature style. Following the Franco-Prussian War of 1870, there was a struggle to understand and define the new national identity within France, and this struggle very much informed Boudin’s artistic pursuits. The country had lost the territories of Alsace and parts of Lorraine to the German Empire, significantly altering the country’s borders, topography and culture, and at this time a universal education system inclusive of French geography was established, forcing the citizenry to grapple with the essential question of what it meant to be French. Landscape painting within France was elevated to a status of even greater importance, and indeed the many seascapes and harbor scenes painted by Boudin in the final decades of the nineteenth century may be viewed as an exploration of this concern. Depicting the delineation between land and sea, coastal imagery was of great import not only for what it allowed Boudin to achieve aesthetically, but also as a visual representation of France’s geographical boundaries at a time when so many of its people felt themselves unmoored. More on this painting

Eugène Boudin, 1824 – 1898, see above

Paul Signac, 1863 – 1935

LA TURBALLE, c. 1929

Watercolor and black crayon on paper laid down on card

7 7/8 by 17 1/8 in., 20 by 45.4 cm

Private collection

La Turballe is a coastal town of Loire-Atlantique, in Pays de la Loire region. Situated to the north-west of Saint-Nazaire, the town became officially a municipality only in 1865. Until then, the territory consisted of a dozen hamlets and small villages focusing on the ” Agricultural activity, exploitation of salt marshes and fishing.

The establishment of canneries in the second half of the 19th century accelerated and accompanied the development of the port and therefore of the commune. More on La Turballe

Paul Signac, (born Nov. 11, 1863, Paris, France—died Aug. 15, 1935, Paris) French painter who, with Georges Seurat, developed the technique called pointillism.

When he was 18, Signac gave up the study of architecture for painting and, through Armand Guillaumin, became a convert to the colouristic principles of Impressionism. In 1884 Signac helped found the Salon des Indépendants. There he met Seurat, whom he initiated into the broken-colour technique of Impressionism. The two went on to develop the method they called pointillism, which became the basis of Neo-Impressionism. They continued to apply pigment in minute dabs of pure colour, as had the Impressionists, but they adopted an exact, almost scientific system of applying the dots, instead of the somewhat intuitive application of the earlier masters. In watercolours Signac used the principle in a much freer manner. After 1886 he took part regularly in the annual Salon des Indépendants, to which he sent landscapes, seascapes, and decorative panels. Being a sailor, Signac traveled widely along the European coast, painting the landscapes he encountered. In his later years he painted scenes of Paris, Viviers, and other French cities.

Signac produced much critical writing and was the author of From Eugène Delacroix to Neo-Impressionism (1899) and Jongkind (1927). The former book is an exposition of pointillism, while the latter is an insightful treatise on watercolour painting. More on Paul Signac

 

Joaquín Sorolla, 1863 – 1923

Running Along The Beach, c. 1908; Spain

Oil, canvas

50 31/32  x 41 1/32 in. (129.5  x 104.2 cm)

Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida (27 February 1863 – 10 August 1923) was a Spanish painter. Sorolla excelled in the painting of portraits, landscapes, and monumental works of social and historical themes. His most typical works are characterized by a dexterous representation of the people and landscape under the sunlight of his native land. More on Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida

 

Acknowledgement: Sotheby’s,  and others


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14 Classic Works of Art, Marine Paintings – With Footnotes, #32

Claude Monet, (1840 – 1926)

Study Of Boats (Aka Ships In Harbour), 1873

Oil on canvas

91 cm wide by 74 cm high (36” by 29”)

Oscar-Claude Monet (14 November 1840 – 5 December 1926) was a founder of French Impressionist painting, and the most consistent and prolific practitioner of the movement’s philosophy of expressing one’s perceptions before nature, especially as applied to plein-air landscape painting. The term “Impressionism” is derived from the title of his painting Impression, soleil levant (Impression, Sunrise), which was exhibited in 1874 in the first of the independent exhibitions mounted by Monet and his associates as an alternative to the Salon de Paris.

Monet’s ambition of documenting the French countryside led him to adopt a method of painting the same scene many times in order to capture the changing of light and the passing of the seasons. From 1883 Monet lived in Giverny, where he purchased a house and property and began a vast landscaping project which included lily ponds that would become the subjects of his best-known works. In 1899 he began painting the water lilies, first in vertical views with a Japanese bridge as a central feature, and later in the series of large-scale paintings that was to occupy him continuously for the next 20 years of his life. More Oscar-Claude Monet

Claude Monet, (1840 – 1926)

Le bateau-atelier, Monet’s studio-boat, c. 1874

Oil on canvas

Kröller-Müller Museum, The Netherlands

From 1871 to 1878, Claude Monet lived in Argenteuil, a village on the Seine just outside Paris. Following the example of the painter Charles-François Daubigny, he had a boat built in which he could paint the surroundings from on the water. Thus he was able to depict the effects of light on the water and on the landscape from any convenient spot.

In this painting the boat is moored between two poles, motionless on the water. A figure is vaguely distinguishable in the cabin, probably Monet himself. The majority of the canvas is occupied by the clam flowing river, in which the boat studio and the trees, but also the sky are reflected. In this painting, Claude Monet gives an impression of the tranquillity on the water during a summer day. More on Monet

Vincent van Gogh,  (1853–1890)

 Seine with moored boats, spring – 1887.

Oil on canvas

52 x 65 cm

Private Collection

Vincent van Gogh (born March 30, 1853, Zundert, Neth.—died July 29, 1890, Auvers-sur-Oise, near Paris, France). Dutch painter, generally considered the greatest after Rembrandt, and one of the greatest of the Post-Impressionists. The striking colour, emphatic brushwork, and contoured forms of his work powerfully influenced the current of Expressionism in modern art. Van Gogh’s art became astoundingly popular after his death, especially in the late 20th century, when his work sold for record-breaking sums at auctions around the world and was featured in blockbuster touring exhibitions. In part because of his extensive published letters, van Gogh has also been mythologized in the popular imagination as the quintessential tortured artist. More on Vincent van Gogh

Vincent van Gogh,  (1853–1890)

Fishing Boats on the beach at Saintes-Maries, c. 1888

Oil on canvas

Height: 65 cm (25.6 in). Width: 81.5 cm (32.1 in).

Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Saintes-Maries is the subject of a series of paintings that Vincent van Gogh made in 1888. When Van Gogh lived in Arles, he took a trip to Saintes-Maries-de-la-Mer on the Mediterranean sea, where he made several paintings of the seascape and town.

Van Gogh’s week-long trip was taken to recover from his health problems and make some seaside paintings and drawings. At that time Saintes-Maries was a small fishing village with under a hundred homes. More on Van Gogh’s trip

Frederick Judd Waugh, American, 1861–1940

Mid Ocean

Oil on canvas

40 × 50 1/4 in. (101.6 × 127.6 cm)

 The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston

Frederick Judd Waugh (September 13, 1861 in Bordentown, New Jersey – September 10, 1940) was an American artist, primarily known as a marine artist. During World War I, he designed ship camouflage for the U.S. Navy, under the direction of Everett L. Warner.

Waugh was the son of a well-known Philadelphia portrait painter, Samuel Waugh. He studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts with Thomas Eakins, and at the Académie Julian in Paris, with Adolphe-William Bouguereau. After leaving Paris, he moved to England, residing on the island of Sark in the English Channel, where he made his living as a seascape painter.

In 1908, Waugh returned to the U.S. and settled in Montclair Heights, New Jersey. He had no studio, until art collector William T. Evans offered him one in exchange for one painting a year. In later years, he lived on Bailey Island, Maine, and in Provincetown, Massachusetts. 

In 1918, Waugh was recommended to serve as a camouflage artist (or camoufleur) for the U.S. Navy, as a member of the Design Section of its marine camouflage unit (Behrens 2002, 2009). That section was located in Washington, D.C., and was headed by American painter Everett L. Warner (Warner 1919). More on Frederick Judd Waugh

NICOLAAS RIEGEN,  (Dutch. 1827-1889)

Seascape with Three-Mast Ship on Choppy Water

Oil on Canvas

22” by 23”.

Private collection

Nicolaas Riegen was born in Amsterdam, May 31, 1827, where he continued to live and work for the rest of his life. Riegen was a skilled painter of seascapes and river views, of various weather conditions. He was known to have painted city views and landscapes according to the Hague School as well. Riegen exhibited his work during his life at events in Arnhem and Maastricht. Although he was a registered painter, and thus a professional, his work is seldom seen. In 1872 he applied to “Arti et Amicitiae” in Amsterdam. In 1899 Riegen passed away. More on Nicolaas Riegen

THOMAS BUSH HARDY C.19TH

MOUTH OF THE THAMES, c. 1896

WATERCOLOR ON BOARD

Height: 16 & 11 in. by Width: 33 & 28 in.

Private collection

THOMAS BUSH HARDY C.19TH, see below

Montague Dawson RMSA, FRSA (1890–1973)

Ships That Pass

Oil on canvas

28.25 x 42 in

Private collection

Montague Dawson RMSA, FRSA (1890–1973) was a British painter who was renowned as a maritime artist. His most famous paintings depict sailing ships, usually clippers or warships of the 18th and 19th centuries. Montague was the son of a keen yachtsman and the grandson of the marine painter Henry Dawson (18111878), born in Chiswick, London. Much of his childhood was spent on Southampton Water where he was able to indulge his interest in the study of ships. For a brief period around 1910 Dawson worked for a commercial art studio in Bedford Row, London, but with the outbreak of the First World War he joined the Royal Navy. Whilst serving with the Navy in Falmouth he met Charles Napier Hemy (18411917), who considerably influenced his work. In 1924 Dawson was the official artist for an Expedition to the South Seas by the steam yacht St.George. During the expedition he provided illustrated reports to the Graphic magazine.

Montague Dawson RMSA, FRSA (1890–1973)

THE OLD VOYAGER HUDSON HALF MOON – 1609

oil on canvas

20″ x 30.25″ — 50.8 x 76.8 cm.

Private collection

Halve Maen (Dutch pronunciation) was a Dutch East India Company vlieboot which sailed into what is now New York Harbor in September 1609. She was commissioned by the VOC Chamber of Amsterdam in the Dutch Republic to covertly find a western passage to China. The ship was captained by Henry Hudson, an Englishman in the service of the Dutch Republic. More on Halve Maen

After the War, Dawson established himself as a professional marine artist, concentrating on historical subjects and portraits of deep-water sailing ships. During the Second World War, he was employed as a war artist. Dawson exhibited regularly at the Royal Society of Marine Artists, of which he became a member, from 1946 to 1964, and occasionally at the Royal Academy between 1917 and 1936. By the 1930s he was considered one of the greatest living marine artists, whose patrons included two American Presidents, Dwight D Eisenhower and Lyndon B Johnson, as well as the British Royal Family. Also in the 1930s, he moved to Milford-Upon-Sea in Hampshire, living there for many years. Dawson is noted for the strict accuracy in the nautical detail of his paintings which often sell for six figures.

The work of Montague Dawson is represented in the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich and the Royal Naval Museum, Portsmouth. More on Montague Dawson

THOMAS BUSH HARDY, C.19TH

MOUTH OF THE THAMES, c. 1896

WATERCOLOR ON BOARD

Height: 16 & 11 in. by Width: 33 & 28 in.

Private collection

Thomas Bush Hardy (1842, Sheffield – 1897, Maida Vale, London) was a British marine painter and watercolourist. As a young man he travelled in the Netherlands and Italy. In 1884 Hardy was elected a Member of the Royal Society of British Artists. He exhibited with the Society and also at the Royal Academy.

His paintings feature coastal scenes in England and the Netherlands, the French Channel ports and the Venetian Lagoon.

Hardy had nine children. His son Dudley Hardy was a painter, illustrator and poster designer. His daughter Dorothy received an MBE after working as a nurse in the First World War. He died on 15 December 1897 in Maida Vale, London. More on Thomas Bush Hardy

 Samuel Bough, English (1822 – 1878)

Off St Andrews, c. 1856

Oil on canvas

36.20 x 45.80 cm

National Galleries of Scotland

This dramatically lit scene shows a view just off the harbour of St Andrews, looking back towards the town. The remains of the ruined Cathedral can be seen perched on the hill. They form a backdrop to the foreground drama of the fishing boat venturing out into the turbulent waters of St Andrews Bay, notorious for its heavy swell and frequent shipwrecks. Benefitting from improvements in rail connections across Scotland, Bough made frequent excursions to the coastal towns and villages of the East Neuk of Fife from the 1850s to the 1870s. This painting was completed in 1856, the same year that Bough was elected an Associate of the Royal Scottish Academy. More on this painting

Samuel Bough RSA (1822–1878) was an English-born landscape painter who spent much of his career working in Scotland. He was raised in relative poverty, but with a keen encouragement in the arts.

He was self-taught but mixed with local artists such as Richard Harrington and George Sheffield, and was strongly influenced by the work of Turner. After an unsuccessful attempt to live as an artist in Carlisle he obtained a job and as a theatre scenery painter in Manchester in 1845, and later in Glasgow. Encouraged by Daniel Macnee to take up landscape painting he moved to Hamilton from 1851-4 and worked there. In 1854 he moved to Port Glasgow to work on his technique of painting ships and harbours. He also began supplementing his income by illustrating books, before moving to Edinburgh in 1855.

His health began to fail in 1877 and in January 1878 he suffered a stroke. He died of prostate cancer. More on Samuel Bough RSA

Edward Cucuel, 1875 – 1954

THE GATEWAY TO AMERICA (FROM GOVERNOR’S ISLAND), c. 1928

Oil on canvas

25 3/4 by 31 3/4 inches, (65.4 by 80.6 cm)

Private collection

In the present picture Cucuel illustrates southern Manhattan from a vantage point on Governor’s Island. At right is Castle Williams, a circular fortification on the northwest point of the island and part of a system of forts constructed in the early 19th century to protect New York City from naval attack. Other structures visible in the skyline include the Woolworth Building, the International Mercantile Marine Company and the Whitehall Building. More on this painting

Edward Cucuel (August 6, 1875, San Francisco – April 18, 1954, Pasadena, California), was an American-born painter who lived and worked in Germany. At the age of fourteen he was already attending the San Francisco Art Institute and doing illustrations for The Examiner. At the age of seventeen, he went to Paris where he attended the Académie Julian and the Académie Colarossi, finishing at the Académie des Beaux-Arts under Jean-Léon Gérôme. When he came back to the United States in 1896, he briefly worked as a newspaper illustrator in New York, but returned to France and Italy to acquaint himself with the old masters at first hand. He ended up in Germany in 1899, where he worked as a free-lance newspaper illustrator in Berlin and Leipzig.

Following a brief stay in San Francisco to visit his family after the earthquake, he settled in Munich in 1907. It was there that he was introduced to plein-air painting. He also became a member of the Munich Secession. In 1913, he became a member of the Société Nationale des Beaux-Arts and exhibited with the Salon d’Automne. During the First World War, he lived in Holzhausen on the Ammersee, later establishing studios in Munich and Starnberg, his father’s hometown. From 1928 to 1939, he commuted between there and New York, where he spent the winters. The beginning of World War Two forced him to leave Germany for good in 1939. He settled in Pasadena, California, where he lived until his death in 1954. More on Edward Cucuel

Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida,  (1863 – 1923)

RECOGIENDO LA BARCA, PLAYA DE VALENCIA (THE RETURN OF THE BOAT, VALENCIA BEACH), 1909

oil on canvas

16 by 24cm., 6¼ by 9½in

Private collection

Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida (27 February 1863 – 10 August 1923) was a Spanish painter. Sorolla excelled in the painting of portraits, landscapes, and monumental works of social and historical themes. His most typical works are characterized by a dexterous representation of the people and landscape under the sunlight of his native land. More on Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida

Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida,  (1863 – 1923)

On San Sebastian Beach, c. 1895-1900

Oil on Canvas

32.7 cm (12.87 in.)x 22.7 cm (8.94 in.)

A Repository of Paintings Archive

 

Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida,  (1863 – 1923), see above

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