01 Orientalist Painting, Edwin Longsden Long’s THE IONIAN POTTERY SELLER, with footnotes, #107

Edwin Longsden Long, British, 1829 – 1891
THE IONIAN POTTERY SELLER, c.1881

Oil on canvas
46 by 35⅛ in.; 116.8 by 89.4 cm
Private collection

Ionia is the name given during ancient times to the central region of Anatolia ’s Aegean shore in Asia Minor, present-day Turkey, one of the most important centres of the Greek world. On the islands and cities of Ionia the style of pottery was not as rigorously geometric as it was in the Dorian ceramic from the continent.  Some Ionian schools of archaic pottery such as Corinth and Rhodes were highly influence by Eastern styles, the so called Orientalizing style. More on Ionian Pottery

Edwin Longsden Long RA (12 July 1829 – 15 May 1891) was an English genre, history, biblical and portrait painter. Long was born in Bath, and was educated at Dr. Viner’s School in Bath. Adopting the profession of a painter, Long came to London and studied in the British Museum. He was subsequently a pupil in the school of James Mathews Leigh in Newman Street London, and practiced first as a portrait artist painting Charles Greville, Lord Ebury and others.

Long made the acquaintance of John Phillip RA, and accompanied him to Spain, where they spent much time. Long was greatly influenced by the paintings of Velasquez and other Spanish masters, and his earlier pictures, such as ‘La Posada’ (1864) and ‘Lazarilla and the blind beggar’ (1870), were painted under Spanish influence. His first important pictures were ‘The Suppliants’ (1872) and ‘The Babylonian marriage market’ (both subsequently purchased by Thomas Holloway). In 1874, he visited Egypt and Syria, and subsequently his work took a new direction. He became thoroughly imbued with middle-eastern archaeology and painted oriental scenes like ‘The Egyptian Feast’ (1877), ‘The Gods and their makers’ (1878) etc.

Long was elected an associate of the Royal Academy in 1870 and an academician (RA) in 1881. His pictures suited the taste and appealed to the religious sentiment of a large portion of the public, and their popularity was increased by a wide circulation of engravings. He consequently determined to exhibit his next pictures in a separate gallery of his own in Bond Street, London and there in 1883, and the following years, his ‘Anno Domini’ and ‘Zeuxis at Crotona’ met with great commercial success.

Long died from pneumonia resulting from influenza, at his home, “Kelston” in Netherhall Gardens, Hampstead, on 15 May 1891, in his sixty-second year. He was buried in West Hampstead Cemetery. More on Edwin Longsden Long

Please visit my other blogs: Art CollectorMythologyMarine ArtPortrait of a Lady, The OrientalistArt of the Nude and The Canals of VeniceMiddle East Artists365 Saints and 365 Days, also visit my Boards on Pinterest

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Author: zaidangallery

I search Art History for Beautiful works that may, or may not, have a secondary or unexpected story to tell. I then write short summaries that grow from my research. Art work is so much more when its secrets are exposed

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