01 Painting of the Canals of Venice by the artists of their time, with footnotes. #81

Thomas Moran, (American, 1837-1926)
Venice, c. 1890

Oil on canvas
20 x 30 inches (50.8 x 76.2 cm)
Private collection

Moran was especially fond of using Venice as a theme, particularly because its large areas of expressive sky and reflective water were well suited to his interest in creating luminous effects. He wove references to activities along the city’s waterways into his compositions, along with buildings, pilings, boats and their reflections. It seems significant to note that this 1890 painting was executed immediately following the two visits he made to the site, in 1886 and 1889. More on this painting


Thomas Moran (February 12, 1837 – August 25, 1926) from Bolton, England was an American painter and printmaker of the Hudson River School in New York whose work often featured the Rocky Mountains. Moran and his family, wife Mary Nimmo Moran and daughter Ruth, took residence in New York where he obtained work as an artist. He was a younger brother of the noted marine artist Edward Moran, with whom he shared a studio. A talented illustrator and exquisite colorist, Thomas Moran was hired as an illustrator at Scribner’s Monthly. During the late 1860s, he was appointed the chief illustrator for the magazine, a position that helped him launch his career as one of the premier painters of the American landscape, in particular, the American West.
Moran along with Albert Bierstadt, Thomas Hill, and William Keith are sometimes referred to as belonging to the Rocky Mountain School of landscape painters because of all of the Western landscapes made by this group. More on Thomas Moran

Please visit my other blogs: Art CollectorMythologyMarine ArtPortrait of a Lady, The OrientalistArt of the Nude and The Canals of VeniceMiddle East Artists365 Saints and 365 Days, also visit my Boards on Pinterest

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Author: zaidangallery

I search Art History for Beautiful works that may, or may not, have a secondary or unexpected story to tell. I then write short summaries that grow from my research. Art work is so much more when its secrets are exposed

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