MALCOLM MORLEY, Flying Cloud with Montgolfier Balloon 01 Classic Works of Art, Marine Paintings – With Footnotes, #141

Malcolm Morley

MALCOLM MORLEY (1931–2018)

Flying Cloud with Montgolfier Balloon, 1998

Lithograph on Rives BFK mould-made paper

37 3/4 × 47 in; 95.9 × 119.4 cm

Private collection

Flying Cloud was a clipper ship that set the world’s sailing record for the fastest passage between New York and San Francisco, 89 days 8 hours. The ship held this record for over 100 years, from 1854 to 1989.

Flying Cloud was the most famous of the clippers built by Donald McKay. She was known for her extremely close race with Hornet in 1853; for having a woman navigator, Eleanor Creesy, wife of Josiah Perkins Creesy who skippered Flying Cloud on two record-setting voyages from New York to San Francisco; and for sailing in the Australia and timber trades. More on Flying Cloud

Joseph-Michel Montgolfier (26 August 1740 – 26 June 1810) and Jacques-Étienne Montgolfier (6 January 1745 – 2 August 1799) were paper manufacturers from Annonay, in Ardèche, France best known as inventors of the Montgolfière-style hot air balloon, globe aérostatique. They launched the first piloted ascent, carrying Étienne. Joseph Michel also invented the self-acting hydraulic ram (1796), Jacques Étienne founded the first paper-making vocational school and the brothers invented a process to manufacture transparent paper. More on Montgolfier

Malcolm Morley, British, (1931–2018), London, United Kingdom, based in New York, New York, is best known for his hyperreal paintings and sculptures that pull subject matter from Old Masters, family portraits, current events, travel brochures, and other visual detritus. Using a grid system to transfer the images onto canvas—reminiscent of the Minimalist grid—he also transfers the borders, tears, and folds in order to foreground the objecthood of the image. Of his attempt to move beyond the strictures of photorealism, Morley says, “I make a handmade painting from a readymade.” Dissatisfied with merely reproducing the image, he draws from the vivid colors of Pop Art and collage techniques to further draw attention to the image as an object. More on  Malcolm Morley

Please visit my other blogs: Art CollectorMythologyMarine Art, and The Canals of Venice

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Author: zaidangallery

I search Art History for Beautiful works that may, or may not, have a secondary or unexpected story to tell. I then write short summaries that grow from my research. Art work is so much more when its secrets are exposed

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