Frank H. Mason, Clipper Ship 02 Classic Works of Art, Marine Paintings – With Footnotes, #123

Frank H. Mason

Frank H. Mason, New York/Ohio (1921-2009) 

Clipper Ship

Watercolor and gouache on paper

28 inches x 18 inches

Private collection

A clipper was a very fast sailing ship of the middle third of the 19th century, generally either a schooner or a brigantine. They had multiple types of sail plans but the most common was three masts and a square rig. They were generally narrow for their length, small by later 19th century standards, could carry limited bulk freight, and had a large total sail area. Clipper ships were mostly constructed in British and American shipyards, though France, Brazil, the Netherlands and other nations also produced some. Clippers sailed all over the world, primarily on the trade routes between the United Kingdom and its colonies in the east, in trans-Atlantic trade, and on the New York-to-San Francisco route round Cape Horn during the California Gold Rush. Dutch clippers were built beginning in the 1850s for the tea trade and passenger service to Java.

The boom years of the clipper ship era began in 1843 as a result of a growing demand for a more rapid delivery of tea from China. It continued under the stimulating influence of the discovery of gold in California and Australia in 1848 and 1851, and ended with the opening of the Suez Canal in 1869. More on Clipper Ships

Frank H. Mason2

Frank H. Mason, New York/Ohio (1921-2009) 

Clipper Ship

Watercolor and gouache on paper

28 inches x 18 inches

Private collection

Frank Henry Mason (1 October 1875 – 24 February 1965), RBA, RI, RSMA was an artist best known for his maritime, shipping, coastal and harbour paintings, and as a creator of art deco travel and railway posters. His style is described as ‘light impressionist’ and he was a founder member of the Staithes Art Club whose members are known today as the Staithes group of artists, or the Northern Impressionists. More on Frank Henry Mason

Please visit my other blogs: Art CollectorMythologyMarine Art, and The Canals of Venice

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Author: zaidangallery

I search Art History for Beautiful works that may, or may not, have a secondary or unexpected story to tell. I then write short summaries that grow from my research. Art work is so much more when its secrets are exposed

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