Wladislaw Czachorski, LADY WITH A FAN 01 Paintings, PORTRAIT OF A LADY, of the 18th & 19th C., Diane de Poitiers, with Footnotes. #41

Wladislaw Czachorski

Wladislaw Czachorski, 1850-1911, POLISH

LADY WITH A FAN

Oil on panel

39 by 17.5cm., 15½ by 7in.

Private collection

Władysław Czachórski (22 September 1850 in Lublin – 13 January 1911 in Munich) was a Polish painter in the Academic style.

In 1866 Czachorski attended the School of Fine Arts in Warsaw and had Rafał Hadziewicz as a teacher. He then spent one year at the Dresden Academy, and from there went to the Munich Academy (1869–1873). He received Magna Cum Laude (the Grand Silver Medal) from Munich, and proceeded to travel to France, Italy and Poland after his graduation. He held membership of the Berlin Academy and was also organizer and judge of international exhibitions, even though he had his home in Munich. He was awarded the Order of St. Michael in 1893. In addition, he had many art exhibitions in Poland, taking place in Kraków, Warsaw and Łódź.

“The hallmark of Czachorski’s style, however, and the basis of his fame, are his images of beautiful young women in rich interiors, painted with great realism. He has long been regarded a master of rendering fabrics, jewelry and other details to create the atmosphere of luxury and elegance.” More on Władysław Czachórski

Please visit my other blogs: Art CollectorMythologyMarine Art, and The Canals of Venice

Images are copyright of their respective owners, assignees or others. Some Images may be subject to copyright

I don’t own any of these images – credit is always given when due unless it is unknown to me. if I post your images without your permission, please tell me.

I do not sell art, art prints, framed posters or reproductions. Ads are shown only to compensate the hosting expenses.

If you enjoyed this post, please share with friends and family.

Thank you for visiting my blog and also for liking its posts and pages.

Advertisements

Author: zaidangallery

I search Art History for Beautiful works that may, or may not, have a secondary or unexpected story to tell. I then write short summaries that grow from my research. Art work is so much more when its secrets are exposed

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s