Hendrick Goltzius, Vertumnus and Pomona, 01 Paintings, Olympian deities, by the Old Masters, with footnotes # 21

Hendrick Goltzius, Vertumnus and Pomona

Hendrick Goltzius

Vertumnus and Pomona, c. 1613

Oil on canvas

90 cm × w 149.5 cm

Rijksmuseum

Vertumnus, in the form of an old woman, speaks to his beloved, the naked Pomona. Vertumnus grabs a vine with her right hand. Her walking stick lies between her legs. Pomona lies under an apple tree and holds in her right hand a kind of cutting blade with which she harvested fruit. To the right in the foreground are apples, pears and grapes. More on this painting

In Roman mythology, Vertumnus is the god of seasons, change and plant growth, as well as gardens and fruit trees. He could change his form at will; using this power, according to Ovid’s Metamorphoses, he tricked Pomona into talking to him by disguising himself as an old woman and gaining entry to her orchard, then using a narrative warning of the dangers of rejecting a suitor to seduce her. The tale of Vertumnus and Pomona has been called the only purely Latin tale in Ovid’s Metamorphoses. More on Vertumnus and Pomona

Hendrick Goltzius (January or February 1558 – 1 January 1617), was a German-born Dutch printmaker, draftsman, and painter. He was the leading Dutch engraver of the early Baroque period, or Northern Mannerism, noted for his sophisticated technique and the “exuberance” of his compositions. According to A. Hyatt Mayor, Goltzius “was the last professional engraver who drew with the authority of a good painter and the last who invented many pictures for others to copy”. In middle age he also began to produce paintings. More Hendrick Goltzius

Please visit my other blogs: Art CollectorMythologyMarine Art, and The Canals of Venice

Images are copyright of their respective owners, assignees or others. Some Images may be subject to copyright

I don’t own any of these images – credit is always given when due unless it is unknown to me. if I post your images without your permission, please tell me.

I do not sell art, art prints, framed posters or reproductions. Ads are shown only to compensate the hosting expenses.

If you enjoyed this post, please share with friends and family.

Thank you for visiting my blog and also for liking its posts and pages.

Advertisements

Author: zaidangallery

I search Art History for Beautiful works that may, or may not, have a secondary or unexpected story to tell. I then write short summaries that grow from my research. Art work is so much more when its secrets are exposed

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s