Adriaen Isenbrant, The Virgin and Child 01 Works, RELIGIOUS ART – Interpretation of the Bible! With Footnotes – 26

Adriaen Isenbrant, The Virgin and ChildAdriaen Isenbrant, (1490 – 1551)

The Virgin and Child

Oil on panel (parquetted)

49 x 33.7 cm

Private collector

The present composition is based on a painting of the Virgin and Child by Gerard David, which is housed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. In David’s painting, the Virgin stands surrounded by angels in a niche that opens up onto a view of a city in the background. In comparison to the preceding work, Isenbrant has modernised the architecture, replacing Gothic forms with those of the Renaissance. More on this painting

The Madonna and Child or The Virgin and Child is often the name of a work of art which shows the Virgin Mary and the Child Jesus. The word Madonna means “My Lady” in Italian. Artworks of the Christ Child and his mother Mary are part of the Roman Catholic tradition in many parts of the world including Italy, Spain, Portugal, France, South America and the Philippines. Paintings known as icons are also an important tradition of the Orthodox Church and often show the Mary and the Christ Child. They are found particularly in Eastern Europe, Russia, Egypt, the Middle East and India. More on The Madonna and Child

Adriaen Isenbrandt (or Adrien, Isenbrant, Ysenbrant, Ysenbrandt or Hysebrant; between 1480 and 1490 – July 1551) was a Flemish Northern Renaissance painter, who from documentary evidence was clearly a significant artist of his period, but to whom no specific works can be clearly documented. As hypothesised by art historians, he ran a large workshop specializing in religious subjects and devotional paintings, painting conservatively in the tradition of Early Netherlandish painting. He was believed by Georges Hulin de Loo to be the same person as the anonymous Master of the Seven Sorrows of the Virgin or Pseudo-Mostaert. Other art historians doubt that any works can be reliably attributed to him, and the number of paintings attributed to him by major museums has been in decline for many decades. More on Adriaen Isenbrandt

Please visit my other blogs: Art CollectorMythologyMarine Art, and The Canals of Venice

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Author: zaidangallery

I search Art History for Beautiful works that may, or may not, have a secondary or unexpected story to tell. I then write short summaries that grow from my research. Art work is so much more when its secrets are exposed

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